The Pastorals at SBL 2019

The program book for the 2019 SBL Annual Meeting reveals a robust selection of sessions related to the Pastorals, whether directly or indirectly. We’ve listed below pertinent sessions (alphabetically by presenter last name), with links to abstracts where available. Sessions which very directly engage the Pastorals are listed first, then a few sessions which have some pertinence for the letters but are not said to directly engage them.

Presentations directly related to the Pastorals

Jens Herzer, Universität Leipzig.
“Epicurus, Plutarch and Paul: The Philosophical Discourse on Public Life and the Transformation of Pauline Ethics in 1 Timothy.” (abstract)
Herzer has published prolifically on the Pastorals.

Christopher Hutson, Abilene Christian University
“Lifting the Yoke of Slavery: Infrapolitics and Advice to Enslaved Persons in the Pastoral Epistles.” (abstract)
Hutson’s Yale dissertation focused on the rhetoric of youth in the Pastorals; his roughly half-dozen essays on the letters have culminated this year in the volume on the Pastorals in the Paideia commentary series.

Donghyun Jeong, Emory University
“Ambiguous Prayers in 1 Timothy 2:1–2.” (abstract)

Lyn Kidson, Alphacrucis College
“Saving the Woman in 1 Timothy 2: Childbirth, Women’s Bodies, and the ‘Other Instruction.’” (abstract)
Kidson’s Macquarie dissertation focused on rhetorical strategies in 1 Timothy 1, and she has published other work on 1 Timothy. This session builds on her 2018 SBL presentation.

Myriam Klinker-De Klerck, Theologische Universiteit Kampen voor de Gereformeerde Kerken
“Lois, Eunice and Timothy. The Rhetorical Strategy in 2 Timothy in the Light of Social Exclusion of the First Christians.” (abstract)
Klinker-De Klerck’s published dissertation addressed ethics in 1 Timothy and Titus.

Andrew M. Langford, University of Oregon
“‘They pierced themselves with many pains’: Pain Experience and the Rhetoric of Self-Harm in 1 Timothy.” (abstract)
Langford’s recent University of Chicago dissertation examines the polemical use of contemporary philosophical and medical discourses in the Pastorals to stigmatize the opponents in the letters. He has previously presented on 1 Timothy at SBL.

Anna C. Miller, Xavier University
“The ‘Real Widow’ in the City: Widows, Public Space and Speech in 1 Timothy and the Acts of Thecla.” (abstract)
Miller has presented previously on the Pastorals at SBL.

W. Andrew Smith, Shepherds Theological Seminary and Steve Young, Shepherds Theological Seminary
“Great Expectations: Teststellen Efficacy for Byzantine Manuscripts of 1 Timothy.” (abstract)
Smith is presently working on the Pastorals in the Editio Critica Maior project.

Nebeyou Almeu Terefe, Wycliffe Ethiopia
“Some Notes on the Ge’ez/Ethiopic Manuscripts of 1 and 2 Timothy.” (abstract)
Terefe’s Addis Ababa University Ph.D. thesis is titled “Critical Edition of Pastoral Epistles with Their Andemta Tradition” and contributes to the textual history of Ethiopic biblical material.

James Buchanan Wallace, Christian Brothers University
“1 Timothy and Universal Salvation.” (abstract)

Tommy Wasserman, Ansgar Teologiske Høgskole and Conrad Thorup Elmelund, Københavns Universitet
“Second Timothy – When and Where? Text and Traditions in the Subscriptions.” (abstract)

Presentations indirectly related to the Pastorals

Jon-Paul Lapeña, Harvard Divinity School
“Contextualizing Paul’s Rhetoric of the μέθυσος: Attitudes Toward Drunkenness and its Stigma in the Early Imperial Period.” (abstract)
Though μέθυσος is not used in the Pastorals, this presentation likely has implications for the use of πάροινος in 1 Tim 3:3; Titus 1:7.

Troy W. Martin, Saint Xavier University
“Translating ὑποτάσσειν in the Petrine Station Code as Fitting In instead of Submission.” (abstract)
Martin has published on rhetoric in 1 Timothy and Titus. This presentation would have implications for the use of ὑποτάσσω in Titus 2:5, 9; 3:1.

Larry Perkins, Northwest Baptist Seminary, Langley, B.C. and Mr. Spencer Elliott, Trinity Western University.
“The Use of οἰκία/οἶκος in Greek Exodus: An Attempt to Understand Principles of Lexical Variation in Greek Exodus.” (abstract)
Perkins recently published the volume on the Pastorals in the BHGNT series. This presentation is pertinent to the Pastorals’ variance between οἶκος and οἰκία.

Richard A Rhodes, University of California-Berkeley
“Oikos, oikia and the Problem of Metonymy.” (abstract)
This presentation is pertinent to the Pastorals’ variance between οἶκος and οἰκία.

Tyler M. Schwaller, Wesleyan College (Macon, GA)
“White Fragility and Biblical Interpretation: The Case of Reading Paul on Slavery.” (abstract)
This presentation may have implications for reception history of 1 Tim 6:1-2; Titus 2:9-10.


Coming soon: Gerald Bray, The Pastoral Epistles, ITC

Media of The Pastoral Epistles: An International Theological Commentary

In an earlier post, we briefly mentioned Gerald Bray’s forthcoming volume on the Pastoral Epistles in the recently-begun International Theological Commentary (ITC) series. As the cover reveals, the ITC is a companion series to the well-known International Critical Commentary series, and like the ICC will cover both Old and New Testaments. Students of the Pastoral Epistles may rejoice that
the volume on these letters is one of the inaugural volumes in the ITC.

The publisher’s description page gives the release date as July 25, and Dr. Bray has confirmed this. He also provided a paragraph describing the volume, as follows:

“This commentary offers a verse-by-verse theological interpretation of the First and Second Epistles to Timothy and Titus. Bray reads the letters as authoritative Scripture, moving beyond questions of whether they are pseudonymous, and of whether or not they are post-Apostolic, looking closely at how they have been understood in the life of the Church. Bray engages with the history of commentary surrounding these letters, ranging from the Fathers of the Church to contemporary theology and exegesis. He reads the Epistles as the authoritative word from God to his people, and through his engagement with the history of interpretation shows the constant thread of witness and confession that unites believers across the ages. In so doing, Bray shows why the Pastoral Epistles have survived the passage of time and have retained the canonical authority that they have always enjoyed.”

The Pastorals in NTA 63.1 (2019)

The most recent issue of NTA is a treasure trove for new works on the Pastorals! Not a great deal in the way of journal articles, but plenty overall.

(5) Michel Gourgues, “Sur deux lectures féministes.” Science et Esprit 71.1 (2019): 113–23. In the first half of this review article, Gourgues examines A. B. Huizenga’s Wisdom Commentary volume 1-2 Timothy, Titus (2016) and its focus on texts concerning gender issues.

(265) James Greenbury, “The Contribution of 1 Timothy 2:8–15 and 1 Corinthians 11:5 to the Discussion concerning Women Speaking in Church.” Presbyterion 44.2 (2018): 52–76.

(266) J. Andrew Doole, “Was Timothy in Prison with Paul?” New Testament Studies 65.1 (2019): 59–77. [“no”]

(p. 137) The Paulist Bible Commentary. Edited by José Enrique Aguilar Chiu et al. Mahwah, NJ: Paulist, 2018. This one-volume commentary is unusual in having three different writers handle the Pastorals, each of them having published extensively on the letters: Thomas Söding on 1 Timothy, Michel Gourgues on 2 Timothy, and Michael Theobald on Titus.

(pp. 140-41) Ralph P. Martin and Carl N. Toney. New Testament Foundations: An Introduction for Students. Eugene, OR: Cascade, 2018. [note “The Pastorals and the Close of Paul’s Life,” pp. 539–57]

(pp. 142-43) Mitzi J. Smith, and Yung Suk Kim, “1–2 Timothy and Titus.” Pages 285–92 in Toward Decentering the New Testament: A Reintroduction. Eugene, OR: Cascade, 2018.

(pp. 159-60) Paul S. Jeon, 1 Timothy: A Charge to God’s Missional Household. 3 vols. Eugene, OR: Pickwick, 2017.

(p. 161) Heinz Külling, Mann und Frau, Eltern und Kindern als Bewohner ihres Hauses in den Pastoralbriefen. Zurich: Theologischer Verlag Zurich, 2017.

(pp. 162-63) Karl Müller, Paulus’ Gefangenschaften das Ende der Apostelgeschichte und die Pastoralbriefe. Bibelstudien 19. Munster: LIT, 2018. [TOC] [note the focus on the Pastorals on pp. 59-84]

(pp. 164-165) Receptions of Paul in Early Christianity: The Person of Paul and His Writings Through the Eyes of His Early Interpreters. Edited by Jens Schröter, Simon Butticaz, and Andreas Dettwiler. Beihefte zur Zeitschrift für die neutestamentliche Wissenschaft 234. Berlin: de Gruyter, 2018. [TOC] In this volume, note esp. Lukas Bormann, “Biographie und Rhetorik: Das Paulusbild der Deuteropaulinen” (pp. 143–74); Jens Herzer, “Paulustradition Und Paulusrezeption In Den Pastoralbriefen” (pp. 487–518); Outi Lehtipuu, “Apostolic Authority and Women in Second-Century Christianity” (pp. 607-22).

(pp. 166-67) Anthony C. Thiselton, Puzzling Passages in Paul: Forty Conundrums Calmly Considered. Eugene, OR: Cascade, 2018. [note “Should women not be permitted to speak?,” pp. 55–63; “Can childbearing ever relate to salvation?,” pp. 72–77; “Is the epistle to Titus incurably racist?,” pp. 117–22]

(p. 169) Craig L. Blomberg, A New Testament Theology. Waco, TX: Baylor University Press, 2018. [note chap. 8, “The Pastoral Epistles,” pp. 455–95]

(p. 171) Anne-Cathy Graber and Blandine Lagrut, “Sauvée par la maternité? Si Marie avait lu la letter à Timothée.” Pages 249–68 in Une bible des femmes: Vingt théologiennes relisent des textes controversés. Edited by Élisabeth Parmentier, Pierrette Daviau, and Lauriane Savoy. Geneva: Labor et Fides, 2018.

(p. 178) Mona Tokerek LaFosse, “Those Who Hear: The Power of Learners in 1 Timothy.” Pages 147–70 in Religions and Education in Antiquity: Studies in Honour of Michel Desjardins. Edited by Alex Damm. Numen: Studies in the History of Religions 160. Leiden: Brill, 2018.

(p. 192) Hans-Ulrich Weidemann, “Zwei gegen einen. Die ‘Idee des Mose’ im 2. Timotheusbrief.” Pages 253–78 in Mosebilder: Gedanken zur Rezeption einer literarischen Figur im Frühjudentum, frühen Christentum und der römisch-hellenistischen Literatur. Edited by Michael Sommer, et al. Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament 390. Tübingen, Mohr Siebeck 2017.

Free online Pastorals monographs

Several significant German-language monographs are available online (for non-commercial use) as part of the Digi20 project. They may be read and searched online or downloaded in pdf:

Hermann von Lips. Glaube—Gemeinde—Amt: Zum Verständnis der Ordination in den Pastoralbriefen. Forschungen zur Religion und Literatur des Alten und Neuen Testaments 122. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 1979. (94MB pdf)

Annette Merz. Die fiktive Selbstauslegung des Paulus: intertextuelle Studien zur Intention und Rezeption der Pastoralbriefe. Novum Testamentum et Orbis Antiquus 52. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2004. (120MB pdf)

Michael Wolter. Die Pastoralbriefe als Paulustradition. Forschungen zur Religion und Literatur des Alten und Neuen Testaments 146. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 1988. (92MB pdf)

Marshall’s Commentary Free!

I still think the single best all-around commentary on the Pastoral Epistles in English is Howard Marshall’s volume in the ICC. So, I was excited to see that the free book of the month from Logos is this commentary!

This is an amazing opportunity. If you aren’t signed up to get the alerts for the free book of the month each month from Logos, I encourage you to look into it. It is a great way to expand your electronic library.

Reviews

Linda Maloney has served English-speaking students of the Pastorals by providing in CBQ a summary and review of Michael Theobald, Israel-Vergessenheit in den Pastoralbriefen: Ein neuer Vorschlag zu ihrer historisch-theologischen Verortung im 2. Jahrhundert. n. Chr. unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der Ignatius-Briefe (Stuttgarter Bibelstudien 229. Stuttgart: Katholisches Bibelwerk, 2016). For Maloney, “this book is a mine of precious information and analysis.” You can find the first page of the review here.

Within the last year, Mark Harding has posted a positive review at RBL of T. Christopher Hoklotubbe, Civilized Piety: The Rhetoric of Pietas in the Pastoral Epistles and the Roman Empire (Waco, TX: Baylor University Press, 2017). (full review available to SBL members only)

On RBL’s site, I note there are four volumes of interest up for review by SBL members:
(1) The just-published dissertation by Nathan Nzyoka Joshua, Benefaction and Patronage in Leadership: A Socio-Historical Exegesis of the Pastoral Epistles (Carlisle, Cumbria, UK: Langham, 2018).
(2) Jermo van Nes’s recent dissertation, Pauline Language and the Pastoral Epistles: A Study of Linguistic Variation in the Corpus Paulinum (Linguistic Biblical Studies 16; Leiden: Brill, 2018).
(3) Larry J. Perkins, The Pastoral Letters: A Handbook on the Greek Text (Baylor Handbook on the Greek New Testament; Waco, TX: Baylor University Press, 2017).
(4) Robert W. Yarbrough, The Letters to Timothy and Titus. Pillar New Testament Commentary (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2018).

Recent Resources on 1 Timothy 2:9-15

This most contentious of passages in the Pastorals has generated a secondary literature all out of proportion to its length. A recent comprehensive bibliography of modern works on the passage through 2014 may be found in Andreas J. Köstenberger and Thomas R. Schreiner, eds., Women in the Church: An Interpretation and Application of 1 Timothy 2:9–15 (3rd ed.; Wheaton, IL: Crossway, 2016). The following works — all produced in the last five years! — may now be added (note that commentaries are not listed, as every commentary will self-evidently discuss this passage):

Marianne Bjelland Kartzow, “Reproductive Salvation and Slavery: Reading 1 Timothy 2:15 with Hagar and Mary,” Neot 50.1 (2016): 71–87.

Marjorie J. Cooper, “The Prohibition in 1 Timothy 2:12 in Light of Eve’s Having Been Deceived (1 Tim. 2:14‒15),” Presb 44.1 (2018): 115‒25.

Marjorie J. Cooper and Jay G. Caballero, “Reasoning through Creation Order as a Basis for the Prohibition in 1 Timothy 2:12,” Presb 43.1 (2017): 30‒38.

José Aristides Da Silva Gamito, “Violência e gênero no texto bíblico: O silenciamento das mulheres na Primeira Epístola a Timóteo 2, 9‒15,” Unitas—Revista Eletrônica de Teologia e Ciências das Religiões 6.1 (2018): 1–12.

John P. Dickson, “‘Teaching’ as Traditioning in 1 Timothy 2:12: An Historical Observation,” in The Gender Conversation: Evangelical Perspectives on Gender, Scripture, and the Christian Life, ed. Edwina Murphy and David Starling (Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock, 2016), 109‒19.

Frances Taylor Gench, Encountering God in Tyrannical Texts: Reflections on Paul, Women, and the Authority of Scripture (Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2015), 1–18.

Kevin Giles, What the Bible Actually Teaches on Women. Eugene, OR: Cascade, 2018. [note esp. pp. 118-29; 130-34; 144-51]

Timothy W. Fisher, “Reimagining Paul’s Infamous Words toward Women: 1 Timothy 2:8–15 as Performance Literature,” PhD diss., Trinity Theological Seminary (Evansville, IN), 2018.

Timothy D. Foster, “1 Timothy 2:13–15 as Analogy,” JSPL 7.1–2 (2017): 53–67.

Godfrey Harold, “Socio-Rhetorical Interpretation: A Multi-dimensional Hermeneutical Approach to 1 Timothy 2:1–15,” South African Baptist Journal of Theology 25 (2016): 50–63.

Gary G. Hoag, Wealth in Ancient Ephesus and the First Letter to Timothy: Fresh Insights from Ephesiaca by Xenophon of Ephesus, BBRSup 11 (Winona Lake, IN: Eisenbrauns, 2015), 61–99.

Jamin Hübner, “Revisiting the Clarity of Scripture in 1 Timothy 2:12,” JETS 59 (2016): 99‒117.

Christopher R. Hutson, “‘Saved through Childbearing”: The Jewish Context of 1 Timothy 2:15,” NovT 56 (2014): 392‒410.

Maretha M. Jacobs, “On Fairness and Accuracy in the Academy: A Brief Response to Wim Vergeer’s Use of Terminologies, and Some Simplifications, in the Article ‘The Redeemer in an “Irredeemable Text” (1 Timothy 2:9‒15),’” Neot 51.2 (2017): 359–65.

Hefin Jones, “Women, Teaching, and Authority: A Case for Understanding the Nature of Congregational Oversight as Underlying 1 Timothy 2:11‒12,” in The Gender Conversation: Evangelical Perspectives on Gender, Scripture, and the Christian Life, ed. Edwina Murphy and David Starling (Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock, 2016), 143–54.

Lyn Kidson, “‘Teaching’ and Other Persuasions: The Interpretation of didaskein ‘To Teach’ in 1 Timothy 2:12,” in The Gender Conversation: Evangelical Perspectives on Gender, Scripture, and the Christian Life, ed. Edwina Murphy and David Starling (Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock, 2016), 125–37.

Heinz Külling, Mann und Frau, Eltern und Kindern als Bewohner ihres Hauses in den Pastoralbriefen (Zurich: Theologischer Verlag Zurich, 2017), 19–62.

Benjamin Marx, “‘Wifely Submission’ and ‘Husbandly Authority’ in Plutarch’s Moralia and the Corpus Paulinum: A Comparison,” JGRChJ 14 (2018): 56–88.

Jeff Miller, “Saved through Childbearing? 1 Timothy 2:15 as a Hermeneutical Caveat,” Stone Campbell Journal 20.2 (2017): 215‒25.

Elna Mouton, “Mothering Salvation? Gender and Class in Early Christian Household Discourse,” Neot 50.1 (2016): 1–8.

Emiola Nihinlola, “Saved through Childbearing: An African Feminist Interpretation and Theology,” ERT 40.4 (2016): 314–26.

Jeremy Punt, “Gender Studies and Biblical Interpretation: (How) Does Theory Matter?,” The African Journal of Gender and Religion 24.2 (2018): 68–94.

Dillon T. Thornton, Hostility in the House of God: An Investigation of the Opponents in 1 and 2 Timothy, BBRSup 15 (Winona Lake, IN: Eisenbrauns, 2016), 99–130.

Rob van Houwelingen, “Meaning and Significance of the Instruction about Women in 1 Timothy 2:12‒15,” Sárospataki Füzetek 19.4 (2015): 59‒71.

Wim C. Vergeer, “The Redeemer in an ‘Irredeemable Text’ (1 Timothy 2:9–15),” Neot 50.1 (2016): 71–87.

Annette Weissenrieder. “Of Childbirth and Salvation: 1 Timothy 2:15 in Light of Ancient Medicine and the Artemis Cult in Ephesus.” Pages 347–80 in Gender and Social Norms in Ancient Israel, Early Judaism and Early Christianity: Texts and Material Culture. Edited by Michaela Bauks, Katharina Galor, and Judith Hartenstein. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2019.

Annette Weissenrieder, “What Does σωθήσεθαι [sic] δὲ διὰ τῆς τεκνογονίας ‘To Be Saved by Childbearing’ Mean (1 Timothy 2:15)? Insights from Ancient Medical and Philosophical Texts,” EC 5 (2014): 313‒36.

Johannes M. Wessels, “Changing the Feminine Face of Poverty: Reading 1 Timothy 2:15 from a Socio-Economic Perspective,” Neot 50.1 (2016): 105–22.

Cynthia L. Westfall, Paul and Gender: Reclaiming the Apostle’s Vision for Men and Women in Christ (Grand Rapids: Baker, 2016), 279–312.

Thomas M. Winger, “‘Saved through Child-bearing’? Theology and Hermeneutics in Reading 1 Timothy 2:15,” in The Press of the Text: Biblical Studies in Honor of James W. Voelz, ed. Andrew H. Bartelt, Jeffrey J. Kloha, and Paul R. Raabe (Eugene, OR: Pickwick, 2017), 283–300.

Korinna Zamfir, “Women Teaching—Spiritually Washing the Feet of the Saints? The Early Christian Reception of 1 Timothy 2:11‒12,” ASE 32 (2015): 352‒79.

Benno Zuiddam, “Southern African Perspectives on the Role of Womanhood in 1 Timothy 2:11‒15,” Journal for Christian Scholarship 52:1–2 (2016): 279–96.

Additions to “Forthcoming Publications on the Pastorals”

We have additions to make to our previous post on forthcoming publications on the Pastoral Epistles. We’ve edited that post accordingly, but want to highlight the additions here.

Houwelingen, P. H. R. (Rob) van. “Power, Powerlessness, and Authorised Power in 1 Timothy 2:8–15.” Forthcoming in Power in the New Testament. Edited by A. B. Merz and P. G. R. de Villiers. Leuven: Peeters, 2019 or 2020 projected. This essay is presently available here, along with a summary of its contents.

Lappenga, Benjamin, and David Downs. These authors have a chapter-length treatment of 2 Timothy in a forthcoming [September] 2019 volume on pistis in connection with the exalted Christ in Paul’s writings. From Lappenga: “The opening chapter on 2 Timothy introduces the volume by showing the overwhelming consensus among interpreters who hold to a subjective element of the phrase pistis Christou that Jesus’s pistis is demonstrated principally, if not exclusively, in his suffering and death on the cross. We establish the first challenge to this consensus through a close reading of 2 Tim 2:8-13. Here we demonstrate that to speak of the faithfulness of Christ in 2 Timothy is primarily to speak of the fidelity of the risen Lord, who will ensure the eschatological salvation of those who are ‘in Christ.'”

Maier, Harry. “The Entrepreneurial Widows of 1 Timothy.” In Women, Christianity, and Judaism. Edited by Ilaria Ramelli and Joan Taylor. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2020 projected. An early draft of the essay may be found here, along with a summary description. From the author: “This essay revisits the instructions in 1 Timothy concerning the exhortations for widows (a term in Greek that designates both previously married and unmarried women) younger than 65 to (re)marry. It locates the instruction in the Roman economy in which women were artisans who controlled their assets and it argues that the Pastor’s concern is that women not function as patrons of meetings. Consideration of laws of inheritance and control of property in marriage helps in understanding the instruction single and widowed women to (re)marry. The pastor wants to assure that the control of property be ceded to husbands, in this case to Christian men whom the Pastor entrusts with sole authority to lead Christ assemblies. The essay thus seeks to understand the rule concerning (re)marriage through consideration of the creation of social agency the economy of the Roman Empire offered businesswomen.”

Additions to “2018 Publications on the Pastorals”

Several 2018 publications have come to our attention since we posted an earlier list. We’ve edited the previous post accordingly, but we note here the additions to the list:

Blomberg, Craig L. A New Testament Theology. Waco, TX: Baylor University Press, 2018. [note chap. 8, “The Pastoral Epistles,” pp. 455–95]

Ehrensperger, Kathy. “Διδάσκαλος ἐθνῶν—Pauline Trajectories According to 1 Timothy.” Pages 88–104 in The Early Reception of Paul the Second Temple Jew: Text, Narrative and Reception History. Edited by Isaac W. Oliver and Gabriele Boccaccini with Joshua Scott. Library of Second Temple Studies 92. London: Bloomsbury T&T Clark, 2019. [e-book version released in 2018] Online publisher description. From the volume forward: “Ehrensperger examines the depiction of Paul in 1 Timothy as the
διδάσκαλος ἐθνῶν, which, she contends, stands in clear succession of Paul’s self-presentation in the undisputed letters as the ἀπόστολος ἐθνῶν. By remembering Paul as the διδάσκαλος ἐθνῶν, 1 Timothy can develop a number of issues that Paul addressed to the ἔθνη in Christ. Similarly to the undisputed Pauline letters, the guidance provided in 1 Timothy is clearly envisioned as rooted in Jewish traditions in as much as these are applied to ἔθνη. The advice provided, in other words, is specific rather than universally addressed to all who are in Christ. With this framework in mind, Ehrensperger discusses those passages in 1 Timothy that deal with widows. She argues that the concern for widows in 1 Timothy is seen as part of the obligation to ‘remember the poor’ in analogy to contemporary Jewish practice based on traditional notions of social justice (צדקה), which are applied to the ἐκκλησίαι ἐθνῶν.”

Herzer, Jens. “Paulustradition Und Paulusrezeption In Den Pastoralbriefen.” In Receptions of Paul in Early Christianity: The Person of Paul and His Writings Through the Eyes of His Early Interpreters. Edited by Jens Schröter, Simon Butticaz, and Andreas Dettwiler. Beihefte zur Zeitschrift für die neutestamentliche Wissenschaft 234. Berlin: de Gruyter, 2018. De Gruyter volume description. Abstract: “The place of the Pastoral Epistles within the collection of Pauline letters depends decisively on two aspects: the assessment of their relation to Paul himself as well as to the other letters, and the evaluation of their literary character. Depending on these variables, the concepts of tradition, transmission, transformation, and reception are no longer sharply defined but instead represent aspects of a complex discourse. Within this discourse, each of the Pastorals has its own character: 1 Timothy reveals a relation to Paul and the Pauline tradition that is different to those in Titus and 2 Timothy. Therefore, each of these three letters shows a specific profile with regard to both the reception of Paul (or Pauline ideas) and the definition of Pauline tradition.”

Joshua, Nathan Nzyoka. Benefaction and Patronage in Leadership: A Socio-Historical Exegesis of the Pastoral Epistles. Carlisle, Cumbria, UK: Langham, 2018. Publisher’s description.

Kaiser, Ursula Ulrike. Die Rede von “Wiedergeburt” im Neuen Testament: Ein metapherntheoretisch orientierter Neuansatz nach 100 Jahren Forschungsgeschichte. Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament 413. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2018. [Significant discussions of Titus 3:5] Publisher volume description.

Karaman, Elif Hilal. Ephesian Women in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Perspective. Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament 2/474. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2018. Publisher volume description.

Maier, Harry O. “Marcion the Circumcizer.” Pages 97–108 in Marcion of Sinope as Religious Entrepreneur. Edited by Markus Vinzent. Studia Patristica 99. Leuven: Peeters, 2018. Online volume description. Abstract: “A chief element against the view that the pseudonymous Pastorals (1 and 2 Timothy and Titus) polemicize against Marcion is the association of opponents with Judaism. The essay addresses this apparent contradiction through an analysis of Tit. 1:10, where the author represents the opposition as ‘of the circumcision.’ The article argues that the reference is a rhetorical charge against Marcion as guilty of promoting community discord. Paul’s report of Gal. 1:18-2:14 was important to Marcion as an account of the apostle’s dedication to his revealed Gospel against opponents in/from Jerusalem. Acts, perhaps motivated by an anti-Marcionite polemic, represents an alternative account, not of Paul opposed by Jerusalem Christ followers, but endorsed by them. The essay observes how Irenaeus and Tertullian in opposition to Marcion seek to harmonize the report from Acts and the confrontation of Paul with Peter in Gal. 2:10-14, to show how Paul never separated from the other disciples, but was instructed by them. The Pastorals polemicize against Marcion in a different way by turning the tables on him and associating him with ‘false brethren’ (Gal. 2:4) and the ‘circumcision party’ (Gal. 2:12; Acts 11:2; 15:2) opposed to Paul’s Gospel. As such they pillory their opponent as a factionalist and thus use the unique accounts reported in Galatians, so important to Marcion, against him.”

Rambiert-Kwasniewska, Anna. “Mąż jednej żony? [Husband of one wife?] (1 Tm 3,2).” Nowe Życie 35 (2018): 6/518, 12-13.

Thurén, Lauri. “Divine Headhunting? The Function of the Qualifications of Deacons in 1 Tim 3:8–13.” Pages 117–30 in Deacons and Diakonia in Early Christianity. Edited by Bart J. Koet, Edwina Murphy, and Esko Ryökäs. Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament 2/479. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2018.

Forthcoming Publications on the Pastoral Epistles

In a recent post, we looked back at the last year’s publications on the Pastorals. Here, we’ll take a look at some forthcoming titles — expected publications whose date of release ranges from less than a month away to over a decade in the future. Most are monograph-length publications, with a few others sprinkled in for good measure. My deep thanks goes to a number of authors who helpfully were able to provide a short description of their work, and publishers who responded to inquiries about forthcoming titles! If you are aware of other forthcoming academic work on the Pastorals, please leave a comment.

The list given below is provided in pdf format (hyperlinks included) here.

__________________________

Beale, Gregory K., and Christopher Beetham. Volume on the Pastorals in the Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, forthcoming 2022. From the author: “The contribution of the commentary will be in the area of the use of the OT in the Pastoral Epistles.”

Cover image for The Law’s Universal Condemning and Enslaving Power: Reading Paul, the Old Testament, and Second Temple Jewish Literature By Bryan Blazosky

Blazosky, Bryan. The Law’s Universal Condemning and Enslaving Power. BBRSup 24. Winona Lake, IN: Eisenbrauns, forthcoming [June] 2019. Publisher’s synopsis. From the author: “In spite of the wealth of literature on Paul’s view of the Mosaic law’s relationship to Gentile Christians, little has been written about how the law relates to Gentile unbelievers. This book examines whether Paul teaches that Gentiles are condemned by and enslaved under the law. Furthermore, this study explores the logic of Paul’s approach and compares his view on this issue to views found in the Old Testament and Second Temple Jewish literature. As far as the contribution of this book to the Pastoral Epistles, on the one hand, I only cover one section of the Pastoral Epistles (1 Timothy 1:8–11) in part of one chapter (the chapter on Pauline writings outside of Galatians and Romans). On the other hand, I intentionally address 1 Timothy 1:8–11 because it is so relevant to the topic of Gentile condemnation and the law of Moses and also because this text is so often overlooked in Paul and the law studies simply because it’s in the Pastoral Epistles. In my treatment of this text, I examine what Paul means by νομίμως in 1 Timothy 1:8, Paul’s extensive allusion to the Decalogue in 1 Timothy 1:9–10, and Paul’s argument that one of the proper uses of the Mosaic law is to use it to expose and condemn the lawless.”

Bray, Gerald. Bray’s work on the Pastorals will appear in the International Theological Commentary, a newer series produced as a sort of companion series to the International Critical Commentary. ITC series webpage.

Brown, Michael I. 2 Timothy. Lectio Continua Expository Commentary on the New Testament. Dallas, GA: Tolle Lege, forthcoming.

Dodson, Joseph R. “Paul, the Pastor, and the Gift.” In Christian Origins and the Formation of the Early Church. Edited by Stanley Porter and Andrew Pitts. TENTS/ECHC 5. Leiden: Brill, forthcoming 2019 or 2020. From the author: “This essay is a modified version of a paper I delivered in San Antonio at ETS in 2016. It is a response to John M. G. Barclay’s Paul and the Gift. In that monograph, Barclay admits that his conclusions might be different if he included all of the letters ascribed to Paul, and perhaps Barclay’s promised sequel will include these other epistles. Until then, I offer this essay as an initial attempt to apply Barclay’s heuristic model beyond the undisputed letters. Therefore, I select the most relevant passages from the Pastoral Epistles regarding God’s grace-gift (1 Tim 1:12–17; 2 Tim 1:8–12; and Titus 2:11–3:8) and investigate them in view of Barclay’s six perfections on the one hand and in light of Barclay’s conclusions on the other.” 

Ebojo, Edgar Battad. “A Scribe and His Manuscript: An Investigation into the Scribal Habits of Papyrus 46 (p. Chester Beatty ii – p. Mich. Inv. 6238).” PhD thesis, University of Birmingham, 2014. The question of whether the LTT could have been part of P46 receives extended attention on pp. 204–35.
The author plans to publish the work, though no immediate plans have been made for publication; the quality of the work, however, suggests there will be no problem in finding a publisher. In the meantime, the thesis is publicly available here and supplemental information here.

Fitzgerald, John T. The Pastoral Epistles: A Commentary. Hermeneia. Minneapolis: Fortress, forthcoming. Fitzgerald’s work will replace the important Dibelius/Conzelmann volume in Hermeneia, and is slated for release in the late 2020s, over 50 years after its predecessor’s publication. Anyone familiar with Fitzgerald’s previous publications will rightly expect his Pastorals commentary to give special attention to the letters as distinctly Christian documents within the broader context of the Greco-Roman world.

Gatiss, Lee, and Bradley G. Green. These two scholars are preparing the volume on the Pastorals in the Reformation Commentary on Scripture series. Downers Grove, IL: IVP Academic, forthcoming 2019.

Hall, David W. 1 Timothy. Lectio Continua Expository Commentary on the New Testament. Dallas, GA: Tolle Lege, forthcoming.

Epiphanies of the Divine in the Septuagint and the New Testament

Herzer, Jens. “The Epiphany of God and the Coming of the Messiah: Reading the Septuagint with the Pastoral Epistles.” In Epiphanies of the Divine in the Septuagint and the New Testament: V. International Symposium of the Corpus Judaeo-Hellenisticum Novi Testamenti, 14–17 May 2015, Nottingham. Edited by Roland Deines and Mark Wreford. Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, forthcoming 2019. Publisher volume description.

Houwelingen, P. H. R. (Rob) van. “Power, Powerlessness, and Authorised Power in 1 Timothy 2:8–15.” Forthcoming in Power in the New Testament. Edited by A. B. Merz and P. G. R. de Villiers. Leuven: Peeters, 2019 or 2020 projected. This essay is presently available here, along with a summary of its contents.

Hultgren, Arland J. “The Pastoral Epistles and the Scriptures of Israel.” In Paul and Scripture. Edited by Stanley E. Porter and Christopher D. Land. Pauline Studies 10. Leiden: Brill, [February] 2019.

Hutson, Christopher R. The Pastoral Epistles. Paideia Commentaries. Grand Rapids: Baker, forthcoming [November] 2019. Publisher’s description: “Among commentaries on the Pastoral Epistles, this one is distinctive for its emphasis on ministerial formation. While considering the particular features of each individual letter, Hutson reads these three letters collectively as an epistolary handbook for young ministers. The ‘Theological Issues’ sections often discuss how aspects of these letters inform Christian ministry.
“Hutson’s exegetical analysis explores how the letters reflect an early Christian community still close to its Jewish roots and living in a Greco-Roman society that is always uncomprehending and often hostile. He applies James Scott’s ‘hidden transcript’ theory to show how Pastoral Paul’s advice helped Christian communities deflect suspicion and establish positive engagement with the wider society. Hutson’s approach is fruitful for understanding ethical issues in these letters, including teachings about slavery, women, and the ethical expectations of Christian leaders. At the same time, Hutson resists a hermeneutic of suspicion that views these letters as hopelessly patriarchal and written to inculcate Roman domestic values as normative for Christian churches. Hutson mounts robust arguments against discrimination on the basis of gender, ethnicity, or social class, but he does so from the Christological and eschatological warrants that he finds to be driving the letters.
“Theological reflections are broadly ecumenical, drawing insights from Orthodox, Catholic, Anglican, Methodist, Reformed, Pietist, Pentecostal, and other traditions to show how Christians from various periods and contexts have understood and applied these letters. The goal is to open up a deep well of resources from which ministers can draw as they seek to engage new challenges in the twenty-first century.”

Jeon, Paul. 2 Timothy. Eugene, OR: Pickwick, 2020 projected.

Langford, Andrew M. Langford’s 2018 University of Chicago dissertation, “Diagnosing Deviance: Pathology and Polemic in the Pastoral Epistles,” was supervised by Margaret M. Mitchell. Several factors suggest its eventual publication, so I include here the abstract provided at ProQuest: “This dissertation argues that the single, post-Pauline author of the Pastoral Epistles crafts a stigmatizing depiction of his theological opponents by spatializing, demonizing, and pathologizing their alleged deviance in order to provide an authoritative model for how to address unwanted diversity in teaching, community norms, church governance, and the interpretation of Paul’s letters in the post-Pauline era. It demonstrates that the Pastor creatively synthesizes diverse sources, pursuing his agenda both through creative acts of authorial fiction that draw upon key themes and terms from the Pauline homologoumena and through the appropriation of language and ideas from contemporary philosophical and medical discourses. This dissertation contributes new insights on the traditional problem of opponents in the Pastorals by 1) identifying and interpreting hitherto under-appreciated narrative devices like the spatializing of deviance and obedience, 2) demonstrating through research in ancient medical literature that the Pastor’s use of medical imagery is more pervasive and cohesive than previously thought, 3) arguing for the necessity of interpreting the Pastor’s pathologizing of deviance in light of ancient disease etiologies and models of corporeality, 4) demonstrating the pervasiveness and function of the rhetoric of mental illness (itself a culturally constructed category drawn upon polemically by the Pastor) with insights from disability studies, and 5) drawing upon recent interpretive insights about the function of authorial fiction and “corrective composition” to demonstrate that the Pastor is self-consciously appropriating particular moments in the Pauline epistolary in order to craft a backwards and forward-looking approach to the problem of opponents per se in the Pastoral Epistles. This dissertation constitutes another contributing argument for the unified composition of these letters as a mini-corpus designed to supplement an emerging corpus of Paul’s letters.”

Lappenga, Benjamin, and David Downs. These authors have a chapter-length treatment of 2 Timothy in a forthcoming [September] 2019 volume on pistis in connection with the exalted Christ in Paul’s writings. From Lappenga: “The opening chapter on 2 Timothy introduces the volume by showing the overwhelming consensus among interpreters who hold to a subjective element of the phrase pistis Christou that Jesus’s pistis is demonstrated principally, if not exclusively, in his suffering and death on the cross. We establish the first challenge to this consensus through a close reading of 2 Tim 2:8-13. Here we demonstrate that to speak of the faithfulness of Christ in 2 Timothy is primarily to speak of the fidelity of the risen Lord, who will ensure the eschatological salvation of those who are ‘in Christ.'”

MacLean, Malcolm. Titus and Philemon. Lectio Continua Expository Commentary on the New Testament. Dallas, GA: Tolle Lege, forthcoming.

Maier, Harry. “The Entrepreneurial Widows of 1 Timothy.” In Women, Christianity, and Judaism. Edited by Ilaria Ramelli and Joan Taylor. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2020 projected. An early draft of the essay may be found here, along with a summary description. From the author: “This essay revisits the instructions in 1 Timothy concerning the exhortations for widows (a term in Greek that designates both previously married and unmarried women) younger than 65 to (re)marry. It locates the instruction in the Roman economy in which women were artisans who controlled their assets and it argues that the Pastor’s concern is that women not function as patrons of meetings. Consideration of laws of inheritance and control of property in marriage helps in understanding the instruction single and widowed women to (re)marry. The pastor wants to assure that the control of property be ceded to husbands, in this case to Christian men whom the Pastor entrusts with sole authority to lead Christ assemblies. The essay thus seeks to understand the rule concerning (re)marriage through consideration of the creation of social agency the economy of the Roman Empire offered businesswomen.”

Frauen im antiken Judentum und frühen Christentum

Merz, Annette. “‘New’ Woman? Bruce W. Winters These und ihre Rezeption in der exegetischen Diskussion kritisch beleuchtet.” Pages 209-34 in Frauen im antiken Judentum und frühen Christentum. Edited by Jörg Frey and Nicole Rupschus. WUNT 2. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, forthcoming [May] 2019. Publisher volume description.

Merz, Annette. Merz is preparing for publication an expanded English-language version of her article “Gen(de)red power: Die Macht des Genres im Streit um die Frauenrolle in Pastoralbriefen und Paulusakten.” HTS Teologiese Studies 68.1 (2012): 71–80.

Nel, Marius. 1–2 Timothy, Titus. The Story of God Bible Commentary. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, forthcoming.

Pao, David W. Volume on the Pastorals in the Brill Exegetical Commentary Series. Leiden: Brill, forthcoming 2020 or 2021. According to Brill, this new commentary series is projected to launch at the end of 2019, so Pao’s volume should be one of the first published in the series. From the author: “There will be five major sections for each paragraph of biblical text: translation, text-critical analysis, grammatical analysis, historical analysis, and theological analysis. Unique to this series is close interaction with the Greek text, informed by recent developments in the study of the Greek language.”

Porter, Stanley E. Pastoral Epistles. Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. Grand Rapids, Baker: forthcoming. From the author: “This commentary approaches the Pastoral Epistles as letters written by the apostle Paul. Several of the distinctives are consideration of issues surrounding time and place of authorship, appraisal of the influence of context upon interpretation of what Paul writes, and a fuller consideration of issues of language than contained in most commentaries. As a result of such considerations, there are a number of new readings of passages offered that attempt to break out of some interpretations that are grounded more in tradition than they are in the language of the text.”

Smith, Andrew. Smith is working on the Pastorals in the Editio Critica Maior project. He contributed this information about his work: “I estimate the editorial work for the ECM edition of the Pastoral Epistles should take 3-5 years. However, there are a number of factors that make an estimate difficult: (1) we are using a larger data set than the other ECM project teams (~300 manuscripts), at least for the collation step (i.e., not all of these manuscripts will make it to the apparatus); (2) the schedules for the versionists’ work may not align well with this project (that may cause a delay); and (3) we’re the first project team that has no central meeting place for an editorial board (such as the INTF).”

Stanley, Steve. 1 & 2 Timothy, Titus. Evangelical Exegetical Commentary.

Van Neste, Ray. Van Neste is working on the Pastorals volume in the Exegetical Guide to the Greek New Testament series. Nashville: B&H Academic, forthcoming.

Wieland, George. “Sin and Its Remedy in the Pastoral Epistles.” Wieland will be contributing this chapter to a publication (edited by John Goodrich and Nijay Gupta) which collects and supplements the work of a recent IBR study group on Sin and Its Remedy in Paul. Projected publication date: 2019.

Zamfir, Korinna. “Eusebeia, Sōtēria and Civic Loyalty in the Pastoral Epistles.” In “Make Disciples of All Nations”: The Appeal and Authority of Christian Faith in Hellenistic-Roman Times. Edited by Loren T. Stuckenbruck, Beth Langstaff, and Michael Tilly. Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament 2/482. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, forthcoming [March] 2019. Publisher volume description.

In addition to the above publications, Jermo van Nes is editing the presentations from the recent conference held in Leuven, Belgium (program) titled “The Pastoral Epistles: Common Themes, Individual Compositions?” They are forthcoming in an issue of Journal for the Study of Paul and His Letters.

Additionally, the proceedings of the Mainz “Ethics in Titus” conference, organized by Ruben Zimmermann and Dogara Ishaya Manomi, are planned for publication in the WUNT series.