Recent Work on the Pastoral Epistles

I am aware of four books related to the Pastorals that have just come out, and thought it would be useful to mention them here.

First is the new volume on the PE in the Baylor Handbook series. The series as a whole has been very well done so I look forward to seeing this PE volume by Larry Perkins.

 

 

Second, is this new edition of Aquinas’s commentaries on the PE, Michael G Sirilla, The Ideal Bishop: Aquinas’s Commentaries on the Pastoral Epistles (Washington, D.C.: The Catholic University of America Press. 2017).

I have only glanced at it so far. Here is the table of contents:

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

  1. Introduction
  2. The Theology of the Episcopacy in the Writings
  3. St. Thomas’s Lectures on the Pastoral Epistles
  4. Lectures on 1 Timothy: Ut gubernet populum
  5. Lectures on 2 Timothy: Ut pro populo subdito patiatur
  6. Lectures on Titus: Ut malos coerceat
  7. Conclusion

 

This will be fascinating in terms of the history of interpretation.

Third, Baylor has also published a new monograph on the Pastorals, Civilized Piety: The Rhetoric of Pietas in the Pastoral Epistles and the Roman Empire by T. Christopher Hoklotubbe. Here is the table of contents for this book:

Introduction: The Politics of Piety in the Pastoral Epistles

  1. Piety in Caesar’s House
  2. Piety in God’s House
  3. Honoring Piety in the City
  4. Honoring Piety in the Ekklēsia
  5. The Mystery of Philosophical Piety
  6. The Mystery of Pastoral Piety

Conclusion: A Pious and Civilized Christian in the Roman Empire

 

Fourth, the Pastorals are dealt within this interesting new book, Paul as Pastor, edited by Brian S. Rosner, Andrew S. Malone, and Trevor J. Burke (New York: Bloomsbury Publishing. 2018). The PE are dealt with by Bob Yarbrough in chapter 11 (which can be viewed at Amazon)

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

  1. The Household Setting of Paul’s Pastoral Practice and its Biblical and Jewish Roots — Brian S. Rosner, Ridley College, Australia
    2. Paul as Pastor in Acts: Modelling and Teaching Perseverance in the Faith – Alan J. Thompson, Sydney Missionary and Bible College, Australia
    3. Paul as Pastor in Romans: Theological Foundations – Colin G. Kruse, Melbourne School of Theology, Australia
    4. Paul’s Pastoral Sensitivity in 1 Corinthians – Matthew R. Malcolm, Trinity Theological College, Australia
    5. Paul as Pastor in 2 Corinthians – Paul W. Barnett, Macquarie University, Australia
    6. Pastoring with a Big Stick: Paul as Pastor in Galatians – Michael F. Bird, Ridley College, Australia and John Anthony Dunne, St. Andrew’s University, UK
    7. Paul and Pastors in Ephesians: The Pastor as Teacher – Peter Orr, Moore Theological College, Australia
    8. Paul and Pastors in Philippians: When Staff teams Disagree – Sarah Harris, Carey Baptist College, New Zealand
    9. Paul as Pastor in Colossians? – Andrew S. Malone, Ridley College, Australia
    10. Mother, Father, Infant, Orphan, Brother: Paul’s Variegated Pastoral Strategy Towards His Thessalonian Church-Family – Trevor J. Burke, Cambridge Theological Federation, UK
    11. Paul as Working Pastor: Exposing an Open Ethical Secret – Robert W. Yarbrough, Covenant Theological Seminary, USA
    12. The Pastoral Offices in the Pastoral Epistles and the Church of England’s First Ordinal – Tim Patrick, Bible College SA, Australia
    13. Augustine of Hippo on Paul as Pastor – Andrew M. Bain, Queensland Theological College, Australia
    14. ‘He Followed Paul’ Whitefield’s Voice: Heroic, Apostolic, Prophetic – Rhys S. Bezzant, Ridley College, Australia

 

Lastly, I have also just received a copy of a recent article, “The Rhetorical Strategy of 1 Timothy,” by Tim O’Donnell published in Catholic Biblical Quarterly, 79:3 (July 2017): 455-475. I look forward to reading this soon.

 

These are encouraging signs for work on these important letters.

Synopsis of the PE Group at ETS 2017

We had a great meeting for the Pastoral Epistles study group at ETS last week, with strong attendance for four helpful papers.

For our first paper we invited Fred Sanders, one of the leading systematic theologians in evangelicalism today. I had noticed a few years ago that Sanders was doing some work on the Pastorals. I contacted him and found out that he was teaching on the letters for a lay institute. He was making shrewd observations on social media, so I was intrigued to see what insight a careful theologian might bring to our question of how serious engagement of the Pastorals might impact our view of Paul.

Sanders titled his paper, “Grace the Civilizer: Paul Undomesticated in the Pastoral Epistles.” He argued that the sheer oddness of the PE gives important information on Paul and that to ignore the Pastorals would be to domesticate Paul. This is a great point and well put, since the typical charge is that the PE tame down the robust Paul. However, today, people seem to shy away from embracing the claims on the PE.

Sanders described the vocabulary of the PE as “a bold, missionary appropriation of Hellenistic moral vocabulary.”  Focusing particularly on Titus, he highlighted the letters concern for form, beauty and order. He argued that Paul’s point was that the grace civilizes people, not merely in a bourgeois fashion leading to dull lives, but in a missional fashion leading to lives of moral beauty which honor God and attract others to the gospel.

Eckhard Schnabel, with a nod to the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, presented 40 theses on “Paul and the Next Generation of Christian Leaders: The Contribution of the Pastoral Epistles to New Testament Ecclesiology.” In bullet point fashion, Schnabel drew key points for ministry which are found in the PE. Quite appropriately in light of the letters in view, Schnabel practically preached certain potions, urging the necessity of personal evangelism, prayer, and endurance. Noting how Paul roots his labors in the saving work of Christ, Schnabel said, referring the work of Christ, “there are some things Christian leaders never stop talking about.”

Greg Couser, from Cedarville University and co-chair of the PE study group, presented “The Judgment of Believers in 2 Timothy: What is Judged and What is the Outcome?” Couser noted that not much work has been done on the numerous references to final judgement in 2 Timothy. Taking the various opinions on the final judgement of believers listed in Schreiner and Caneday (The Race Set Before Us: A Biblical Theology of Perseverance & Assurance), Couser asked which position seems best to fit the evidence in 2 Timothy. Along the way Couser demonstrated that 2 Timothy has much to say about this important topic even though works on Pauline theology tend to neglect this data. Here is an excerpt where Couser states his basic conclusion:

From what Paul seems to say in 2 Tim, his view of the believer’s judgment fits most easily into the “loss of rewards” category. The warnings are more than just rhetorical devices and they are for believers. There is something to lose, though reprobation is not in view. Nonetheless, Paul also reflects an inner-dynamic of the Christian life that makes it impossible to envision any acts of unfaithfulness by a believer as anything more than lapses from an otherwise progressive movement toward greater delight in Christ and service to him.

Marty Feltham, who is finishing his PhD at Macquarie University in Sydney, concluded the session with his paper, “Carefully Crafted or a Clumsy Imitation? Assessing the Argument of 1 Timothy 2:1-7.” One of the things I have been particularly pleased with in our study group has been the opportunity to hear such good papers from younger scholars who are just finishing or just recently finished their doctoral work. Feltham maintained that tradition with a strong argument for the coherence of the theological argument in 1 Timothy 2:1-7 and the connection of this section with the rest of the letter. Following the argument of his recent article in Tyndale Bulletin, Feltham demonstrated that 2:5-6 was a Christological reworking of the Shema (Deut 6:4-5). Contrary to those who have long said the PE lacked anything more than clumsy theological imitation, Feltham argued that 1 Timothy 2:5-6 was a thoughtful and well-worked piece of theological argumentation “perfectly tailored to the rhetorical and polemical needs of the letter.” I thought this was a fascinating paper and I am excited to learn of one more able scholar working in the Pastoral Epistles.

 

3rd edition of Women in the Church

In 2016 a third edition of Women in the Church: An Interpretation and Application of 1 Timothy 2:9–15 edited by Andreas J. Köstenberger and Thomas R. Schreiner was published. Although Baker published the first two editions, this version is published by Crossway. Scott Baldwin’s chapter on αὐθεντέω has been replaced with a chapter by Al Wolters on the same word. Dorothy Patterson’s chapter has been replaced by a roundtable discussion.

The chapter summaries below are taken from the introduction, with permission from Crossway.

The team of contributors, all leading experts in their respective fields, scrutinize in the following pages the various aspects of a responsible interpretation of 1 Timothy 2:9–15: the historical background of first-century Ephesus; the meaning of the word αὐθεντεῖν; the Greek syntax of v. 12, “I do not permit a woman to teach or to exercise authority over a man”; the exegesis of 1 Timothy 2:9–15; the cultural context for applying the passage; matters of Bible translation; and vigorous, spirited interaction on the implications of the reading offered here for women’s roles in the life of the church today.

In chapter 1, S. M. Baugh discusses the first-century background. For more than a century, excavators have been digging in the city of Ephesus, and in the course of that time, archaeologists and ancient historians have unearthed, examined, and evaluated a very large amount of original source material, which makes a fairly intimate knowledge of the city and its inhabitants possible. Unfortunately, this material is not always easily accessible, and misunderstandings sometimes continue for people who look for accurate explanations of the Ephesian background to interpret texts such as 1 Timothy. Hence, while the earlier forms of this essay provided much technical information, this version has been revised to make the subject matter clearer to the nonspecialist. The overall goal is to draw an accurate, brief portrait of the institutions of Ephesus as they relate specifically to the interpretation of 1 Timothy 2 and illumine its message.

In chapter 2, Al Wolters examines the meaning of the verb αὐθεντέω, which occurs in 1 Timothy 2:12 and is commonly translated “have authority.” His main point is that the verb here does not have a pejorative meaning (as in “domineer”) or an ingressive meaning (as in “assume authority”), although in recent decades a number of scholars, versions, and lexica have ascribed these connotations to it. An exhaustive survey of all known occurrences of the verb in ancient and medieval Greek shows that actual usage does not support these lexicographical innovations. While the translation “assume authority” (or the like) is sometimes justified, this is the case only where an ingressive aorist is used, not in other tense forms of the verb, such as the present tense in this passage.

In chapter 3, I examine the essential syntax of what is probably the most contentious section of 1 Timothy 2:9–15: “I do not permit a woman to teach or to exercise authority over a man” (v. 12 ESV). In particular, based on syntactic parallels in both Scripture and ancient Greco-Roman literature, I argue that the two activities joined by the conjunction οὐδέ in 1 Timothy 2:12 (teaching and exercising authority over men) must be, in Paul’s consideration, either both positive or both negative. Paul’s positive view of διδάσκω (teaching) as an activity thus points to his positive view of αὐθεντέω ἀνδρός (exercising authority over a man) as an activity, over against interpreters who have assigned to αὐθεντέω ἀνδρός a negative meaning. In addition, I argue that the two activities of teaching and exercising authority, while related, ought not to be merged into a single idea that is more restrictive than either one is separately (e.g., “seizing authority to teach a man”), an interpretation that some scholars have strenuously advanced in recent years.

In chapter 4, Thomas Schreiner sets forth an interpretation of 1 Timothy 2:9–15. While not every contributor would agree with everything argued for in this essay—especially the interpretations offered for 1 Timothy 2:14–15—the interpretation proposed draws upon the conclusions reached in other chapters of this book (especially Baugh, Wolters, and Köstenberger) and interacts extensively with existing scholarship.

In chapter 5, Robert Yarbrough deals with the hermeneutics of this passage and what the interpretation means for church practice. He denies that this passage asserts the abolition, prevention, or curtailment of women’s leadership in church or society, or women’s exclusion from all teaching and ministry in any capacity whatsoever. Rather, this chapter explores the meaning of the biblical precedent and precept of men’s primary leadership responsibility as pastoral teachers and overseers (cf. Paul’s “teach” and “exercise authority” in 1 Tim. 2:12) in God’s household, the church.

In chapter 6, Denny Burk investigates the claim, advanced by Linda Belleville, that a nonpejorative rendering of αὐθεντεῖν is an innovation of English Bibles produced in the twentieth century. He also examines the shift in translation of αὐθεντεῖν from “have authority” in the NIV 1984 and TNIV 2002 to the ingressive “assume authority” in the TNIV 2005 and NIV 2011. Is the NIV translators’ explanation for the new rendering compelling? Or is it potentially misleading in light of Philip Payne’s pejorative understanding of “assume authority,” which the findings of Al Wolters and Andreas Kӧstenberger in the present volume contravene?

Chapter 7 is devoted to the application of the teaching of 1 Timothy 2:9–15 to women’s and men’s roles in the church today. To this end, we gathered a virtual roundtable of several women and men with a proven track record of speaking out intelligently and knowledgeably on this issue. While diverse in background, these women and men concur in their essential interpretation of the passage as laid out in the present volume. At the same time, while the original meaning of 1 Timothy 2:9–15 is firm, the significance of Paul’s teaching in this passage is multifaceted. The various participants in the roundtable provide a series of perceptive observations on the text and its application as women and men strive to apply the teaching of 1 Timothy 2:9–15 to their lives today.

 

Taken from Women in the Church: An Interpretation and Application of 1 Timothy 2:9–15 by by Andreas J. Köstenberger and Thomas R. Schreiner, © 1995, 2005, 2016, pp. 21-23. Used by permission of Crossway, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers, Wheaton, IL 60187, www.crossway.org.

Review of a Recent Monograph Epistolography & the PE

Chuck Bumgardner has pointed out a helpful review (in English) of a recent monograph on the Pastorals which we listed in a previous post on recent dissertations on the Pastorals.

Korinna Zamfir has reviewed for RBL this monograph:

Luttenberger, Joram. Prophetenmantel oder Bücherfutteral? Die persönlichen Notizen in den Pastoralbriefen im Licht antiker Epistolographie und literarischer Pseudepigraphie. Arbeiten zur Bibel und ihrer Geschichte 40. Leipzig: Evangelische Verlagsanstalt, 2012.

Her review will at least familiarize the English-language PE student with Luttenberger’s work.

Korinna Zamfir, review of Joram Luttenberger, Prophetenmantel oder Bücherfutteral? Die persönlichen Notizen in den Pastoralbriefen im Licht antiker Epistolographie und literarischer PseudepigraphieReview of Biblical Literature (2016).

The link will take you to a page with a brief abstract of the book, but for the full review you have to log in with SBL membership information since  RBL reviews are only publicly available to SBL members.

Pastoral Epistles Study Group this week at ETS

If you are coming to ETS this week, I hope you will plan to come to our Pastoral Epistles session. We have a great slate of papers once again this year.

Here is the information on our session.

11/16/2017
8:30 AM-11:40 AM
Convention Center — Room 550 A

Pastoral Epistles
Impact of the Pastorals on our View of Paul

Moderator
Ray Van Neste, Union University

8:30 AM—9:10 AM
Fred Sanders, Biola University
“Grace the Civilizer: Paul Undomesticated in the Pastoral Epistles”

9:20 AM—10:00 AM
Eckhard Schnabel, Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary
“Paul and the Next Generation of Christian Leaders: The Contribution of the Pastoral Epistles to New Testament Ecclesiology”

10:10 AM—10:50 AM
Greg Couser, Cedarville University
“The Judgment of Believers in 2 Timothy: What is Judged and What is the Outcome?”

11:00 AM—11:40 AM
Marty Feltham, Macquarie University (in Sydney)
“Carefully Crafted or a Clumsy Imitation? Assessing the Argument of 1 Timothy 2:1-7”

 

Pastoral Epistles Publications in 2016

Chuck Bumgardner has once again done us the wonderful service of compiling a list of publications from the year (2016). This is an excellent resource for anyone trying to stay abreast of scholarship on the Pastorals. If you know of an item that should be added to the list please let us know by sending us an email at pastoralepistles at gmail dot com.

 

Aageson, James. “Paul and the Next Generations of the Church.” Pages 111-30 in Windows on Early Christianity: Uncommon Stories, Striking Images, Critical Perspectives. Eugene, OR: Cascade, 2016.

Adewuya, J. A. Holiness in the Letters of Paul: The Necessary Response to the Gospel. Eugene, OR: Cascade, 2016. [Note chap. 10, “Holiness in the Pastoral Epistles,” pp. 148–58]

Barcley, W. B. “Introduction to the Pastoral Epistles,” “1 Timothy,” “2 Timothy,” and “Titus.” Pages 349–400 in A Biblical-Theological Introduction to the New Testament: The Gospel Realized. Edited by Michael J. Kruger. Wheaton, IL: Crossway, 2016.

Bénétreau, S. “Projets apostoliques: selon 2 Timothée 3.10, une sujétion, pour Timothée, aux projets de Paul? Spécificité de liberté chrétienne.” Théologie évangélique [Vaux-sur-Seine] 15.2 (2016): 16-28.

Brannan, Rick. Lexical Commentary on the Pastoral Epistles: First Timothy. Appian Way, 2016.

________. Second Timothy: Notes on Grammar, Syntax, and Structure. Appian Way, 2016.

Brueggemann, W. Money and Possessions. Interpretation Resources for the Use of Scripture in the Church. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2016. (note chap. 13: “The Pastoral Epistles: Order in the Household,” pp. 239–47)

Bumgardner, Charles J. “Kinship, Christian Kinship, and the Letters to Timothy and Titus.” Southeastern Theological Review 7.2 (2016): 3–18.

________. “Paul’s Letters to Timothy and Titus: A Literature Review (2009–2015).” Southeastern Theological Review 7.2 (2016): 77–116.

Butticaz, S. “The Construction of Apostolic Memories in the Light of Two New Testament Pseudepigrapha (2 Tm and 2 Pt).” Annali di storia dell’esegesi 33.2 (2016): 341–63.

Carter, C. L. “Leading down the Via Negativa: I Timothy as a Test Case for an Apophatic Theology of Leadership.” Journal of Asian Evangelical Theology 20.1 (2016): 61–85.

Carter, W. God in the New Testament. Core Biblical Studies. Nashville: Abingdon, 2016. [note chap. 13: “The Household of God and Its Male Guardians (1 Tim 3:1–15; 2 Tim 2:14–26),” pp. 139–150]

Cholvy, B. “‘Vivre dans le temps présent avec réserve, justice et piété’ (Tt), peut-il être désirable?” Recherches de Science Religieuse 104.4 (2016): 533-50.

Couser, Greg A. “Divergent, Insurgent or Allegiant? 1 Timothy 5:1–2 and the Nature of God’s Household.” Southeastern Theological Review 7.2 (2016): 19–34.

________. “‘How Firm a Foundation’: The Ecclesiology of 2 Tim 2:19–21.” Bibliotheca Sacra 173 (2016): 460–75.

Cuvillier, E. “Les collaborateurs dans la communication paulinienne: l’exemple de Timothée.” Protestantesimo 71:1–3 (2016): 61–70.

Davey, Wesley T. “Sight in the Tempest: Suffering as Participation with Christ in the Pauline Corpus.” Ph.D. diss., Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2016. [note “The Place of SPC [suffering as participation with Christ] in 2 Timothy 2:1–13,” pp. 214-33]

Davis, P. A., Jr. Translating 2 Timothy Clause by Clause: An Exegetical Guide. EBooks for Translating the New Testament. Leesburg, IN: Cyber-Center for Biblical Studies, 2016.

DeFranza, Megan K. “Journeying from the Bible to Christian Ethics in Search of Common Ground.” Pages 69–101 in Two Views on Homosexuality, the Bible, and the Church. Edited by Preston Sprinkle. Counterpoints: Bible & Theology. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2016. [note “Corinthians and Timothy—Their Background in Leviticus, Genesis, and Judges,” pp. 72–81]

Dickson, J. P. “‘Teaching’ as Traditioning in 1 Timothy 2:12: An Historical Observation.” Pages 109-19 in The Gender Conversation: Evangelical Perspectives on Gender, Scripture, and the Christian Life. Edited by E. Murphy and D. Starling. Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock, 2016 [Responses by Lyn Kidson, pp. 120-21; and Hefin Jones, pp. 122-24]

Downs, David J., and W. Rogan. “‘Let us teach ourselves first to follow the commandment of the Lord’ (Pol. Phil. 4.1): An Additional Note on ‘the Commandment’ as Almsgiving.” New Testament Studies 62.4 (2016): 628–36.

Dragutinović, P. “Ταῦτα πάσχω (2Tim 1,12): Wer verfolgt wen in den Pastoralbriefen?“ Ephemerides Theologicae Lovanienses 92.3 (2016): 469–86.

Edwards, B. G. “Honor True Widows: 1 Timothy 5:3–16 with Implications for the Church’s Social Responsibilities.” Detroit Baptist Seminary Journal 21 (2016): 87–105.

Elliott, J. H. “The Pastorals and a Weberian Perspective on Ecclesial Authority and Leadership.” Pages 131–57 in Exploring Biblical Kinship: Festschrift in Honor of John J. Pilch. Edited by J. C. Campbell and P. J. Hartin. Catholic Biblical Quarterly Monograph Series 55. Washington, D.C.: Catholic Biblical Association of America, 2016.

Foster, T. D. “1 Timothy 2:8–15 and Gender Wars at Ephesus.” Priscilla Papers 30.3 (2016): 1–10.

Georgia, A. T. “‘Unless he competes professionally’: Agonism and Cultural Production among Christians and Jews in the Roman World.” PhD diss., Fordham University, 2016.

Ghisalberti, G. “The Christology of Shame and the Re-evaluations of Hellenic Ideas in 1 and 2 Timothy.” Heythrop Journal 57.4 (2016): 625–37.

Gourgues, Michel. “Jesus’s Testimony before Pilate in 1 Timothy 6:13.” Journal of Biblical Literature 135.3 (2016): 639–48.

Hartenstein, Judith.“Weibliche Askese und christliche Identität im 2. Jh. n. Chr.” Pages 213-26 in Dem Körper eingeschrieben: Verkörperung zwischen Leiberleben und kulturellem Sinn. Edited by Matthias Jung, Michaela Bauks, and Andreas Ackerman. Studien zur Interdisziplinären Anthropologie. Wiesbaden: Springer, 2016. (Abstract: http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-10474-0_12)

Herzer, Jens. “‘Gefäße zur Ehre und zur Unehre’ (2 Tim 2,20): Metaphorische Sprache und Ethik in den Pastoralbriefen – eine Skizze.” Pages 49–70 in Metapher—Narratio—Mimesis—Doxologie: Begründungsformen frühchristlicher und antiker Ethik. Edited by U. Volp, F. W. Horn, and R. Zimmerman. Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament. Contexts and Norms of New Testament Ethics 7. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2016.

________. “Tradition und Bekenntnis. Die Theologie des Paulus im Spiegel ihrer Rezeption im Ersten Timotheusbrief.” Pages 247–72 in Petrus und Paulus: Geschichte—Theologie—Rezeption. Arbeiten zur Bibel und ihrer Geschichte 48. Edited by H. Omerzu and E. D. Schmidt. Leipzig: Evangelische Verlagsanstalt, 2016.

Hoklotubbe, T. C. “Great Is the Mystery of Piety: Contested Claims to Piety in Plutarch, Philo, and 1 Timothy.” Pages 155–66 in Religious Competition in the Greco-Roman World. Edited by N. P. Desrosiers and L. C. Vuong. SBL Writings from the Greco-Roman World Supplement Series 10. Atlanta: SBL, 2016.

Hübner, Jamin. “Revisiting the Clarity of Scripture in 1 Timothy 2:12.” Journal of the Evangelical Society 59 (2016): 99-117.

Huizenga, A. B. 1-2 Timothy, Titus. Wisdom Commentary. Collegeville, MN: Liturgical Press, 2016.

Jones, H. “Women, Teaching, and Authority: A Case for Understanding the Nature of Congregational Oversight as Underlying 1 Timothy 2:11-12.” Pages 143-54 in The Gender Conversation: Evangelical Perspectives on Gender, Scripture, and the Christian Life. Edited by E. Murphy and D. Starling. Macquarie Park, Australia / Eugene, OR: Morling / Wipf & Stock, 2016 [Responses by John Dickson, pp. 155-56; and Lyn Kidson, pp. 157-59]

Klein, H. “Paulus als Verkündiger, Apostel und Lehrer in den Pastoralbriefen.” Sacra Scripta 12 (2014): 43-63. Reprint, pages 325–43 in Entwicklungslinien im Corpus Paulinum und weitere Studien zu Paulustexten. Edited by T. Nicklas. Forschungen zur Religion und Literatur des Alten und Neuen Testaments 265. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2016.

Köstenberger, Andreas J. and Thomas R. Schreiner, eds. Women in the Church: An Analysis and Application of 1 Timothy 2:9–15.  3rd ed. Wheaton, IL: Crossway, 2016.

Krause, Deborah, “Construing and Containing an Imperial Paul: Rhetoric and the Politics of Representation in the Pastoral Epistles.” Pages 203–20 in An Introduction to Empire in the New Testament. Edited by A.Winn. SBL Resources for Biblical Study 84. Atlanta: SBL, 2016.

Kruger, Michael J. “First Timothy 5:18 and Early Canon Consciousness: Reconsidering a Problematic Text.” Pages 680–700 in The Language and Literature of the New Testament: Essays in Honor of Stanley E. Porter’s 60th Birthday. Edited by Lois Fuller Dow, Craig A. Evans, and Andrew W. Pitts. Biblical Interpretation Series 150. Leiden: Brill, 2016.

Lappenga, B. J. Paul’s Language of Ζῆλος: Monosemy and the Rhetoric of Identity and Practice. Bibilical Interpretation Series 137. Leiden: Brill, 2016. (Titus 2:14 discussed on pp. 205–8)

Long, T. G. 1 & 2 Timothy and Titus. Belief: A Theological Commentary on the Bible. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2016.

Marcheselli-Casale, C. “Commentario Lettere Pastorali a Timoteo e a Tito.” In Le lettere di san Paolo. Edited by A. Biancalani and B. Rossi. Rome: Città Nuova, 2016.

Massey, P. T. “Women, Talking and Silence: 1 Corinthians 11.5 and 14.34–35 in the Light of Greco-Roman Culture.” Journal of Greco-Roman Christianity and Judaism 12 (2016): 127–60. [aside form the obvious implications work that work in 1 Cor 14.34-35 has for 1 Tim 2:9-15, this article briefly engages περίεργοι in 1 Tim 5:13, pp. 134–36]

McKay, J. M., Jr. Translating Titus Clause by Clause: An Exegetical Guide. EBooks for Translating the New Testament. Leesburg, IN: Cyber-Center for Biblical Studies, 2016.

Menéndez-Antuña, Luis. “Cuerpos ambiguos: Un estudio comparativo del status antropológico y político de las mujeres en las Cartas Pastorales y los Hechos Apócrifos de Pablo y Tecla.” ‘Ilu: Revista de ciencias de las religiones 21 (2016): 93–113.

Nihinlola, E. “Saved through Childbearing: An African Feminist Interpretation and Theology.” Evangelical Review of Theology 40.4 (2016): 314–26.

Obielosi, D. C. “Inspiration and Inerrancy of the Bible: An Exegetical Interpretation of 1Tim 3,16.” Journal of Religion and Human Relations 8.1 (2016): 1–19.

Ong, Hughson T. “Is There a Heresy in the Pastorals? A Sociolinguistic Analysis of 1 and 2 Timothy via the Ethnography of Communication Theory.” Pages 119-38 in Paul and Gnosis. Edited by S. E. Porter and D. I. Yoon. Pauline Studies 9. Leiden: Brill, 2016.

Opatrný, D. “Theologically Significant Textual Variants in the Pastoral Epistles.” Pages 229–39 in The Process of Authority: The Dynamics of Transmission and Reception of Canonical Texts. Edited by J. Dušek and J. Roskovec. Deuterocanonical and Cognate Literature Studies 27. Berlin: de Gruyter, 2016.

Pervo, Richard I. The Pastorals and Polycarp: Titus, 1–2 Timothy, and Polycarp to the Philippians. Scholars Bible 5. Salem, OR: Polebridge, 2016.

Pietersen, Lloyd K. “Artemis, Demons, Mammon and Satan: The Construal of Evil in 1 Timothy.” In Evil in Second Temple Judaism and Early Chrisitanity. Edited by C. Keith and L. Stuckenbruck. Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament 2/417. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2016.

Pitts, Andrew W., and J. D. Tyra. “Exploring Linguistic Variation in an Ancient Greek Single-Author Corpus: A Register Design Analysis of Josephus and Pauline Pseudonymity.” Pages 257–83 in The Language and Literature of the New Testament: Essays in Honor of Stanley E. Porter’s 60th Birthday. Edited by L. K. Fuller Dow, C. A. Evans, and A. W. Pitts. Biblical Interpretation Series 50. Leiden: Brill, 2016.

Smith, Craig A. 2 Timothy. Readings: A New Biblical Commentary. Sheffield: Sheffield Phoenix, 2016.

Stiekes, Gregory J. “The Fall of Eve in Paul.” Ph.D. diss., Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2016. [note specific treatment of 1 Tim. 2:13–14 on pp. 49–56, 184–97]

________. “Paul’s Family of God: What Familial Language in the Pastorals Can and Cannot Tell Us about the Church.” Southeastern Theological Review 7.2 (2016): 35–56.

Swinson, L. Timothy. “Πιστὸς ὁ λόγος: An Alternative Analysis.” Southeastern Theological Review 7.2 (2016): 57–76.

Theobald, M. “Alt und Neu. Innovative Begriffsbildungen in den Pastoralbriefen als Indiz ihres pseudepigraphen Charakters.” Pages 357-380 in Der jüdische Messias Jesus und sein jüdischer Apostel Paulus. Edited by A. D. Baum, D. Häußer and E. L. Rehfeld. Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament 2/425. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2016.

________. Israel-Vergessenheit in den Pastoralbriefen: Ein neuer Vorschlag zu ihrer historisch-theologischen Verortung im 2. Jahrhundert. n. Chr. unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der Ignatius-Briefe. Stuttgarter Bibelstudien 229. Stuttgart: Katholisches Bibelwerk, 2016.

Thiessen, J. (with R. Fuchs). Die umstrittenen Paulusbriefe—Abschriften und Fälschungen? Intertextuelle, literarkritische und theologische Studien. Studien zu Theologie und Bibel 19. Wien: LIT, 2016. [note “Die ‘Pastoralbriefe’ — Fälschungen eines Paulusschülers?,” pp. 231–404]

Thornton, Dillon. Hostility in the House of God: An Investigation of the Opponents in 1 and 2 Timothy. Bulletin for Biblical Research Supplement 15. Winona Lake, IN: Eisenbrauns, 2016.

________.“‘Saying What They Should Not Say’: Reassessing the Gravity of the Problem of the Younger Widows (1 Tim 5:11–15).” Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society 59.1 (2016): 119-29.

Urban, D. V. “Allusion to 1 Timothy 5:17 in John Milton’s Paradise Lost 9.332.” Notes & Queries 63.1 (2016): 59.

Van Nes, Jermo. “On the Origin of the Pastorals’ Authenticity Criticism: A ‘New’ Perspective.” New Testament Studies 62.2 (2016): 315-20.

Vollenweider, S. “‘Einer ist der Mittler‘ (1 Tim 2,5): Mittleraussagen der neutestamentlichen Briefliteratur in ihren frühjüdischen und hellenistischen Kontexten.“ Pages 209–28 in Vermittelte Gegenwart: Konzeptionen der Gottespräsenz von der Zeit des Zweiten Tempels bis Anfang des 2. Jahrhunderts n. Chr. Edited by A. Taschl-Erber and I. Fischer. Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament 367. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2016.

Weidemann, Hans-Ulrich. “Die Pastoralbriefe,” Theologische Rundschau 81.4 (2016): 353-403.

Westfall, Cynthia L. Paul and Gender: Reclaiming the Apostle’s Vision for Men and Women in Christ. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker, 2016. [note chap. 9, “1 Timothy 2:11–15”]

Zamfir, Korinna. “Üdvösség a házasság vagy a szüzesség útján? A pasztorális levelek és a Tekla-cselekedetek vitája [Salvation Through Marriage or Virginity? The Debate of the Acts of Thecla with the Pastoral Epistles].” Pages 127–43 in “Kincseiből régit és újat”: Ünnepi kötet Gaál Endre 70. születésnapjára. Edited by F. TAMÁS. Esztergom: Esztergomi Hittudományi Főiskola, 2016.

Zamfir, Korinna, and J. Verheyden. “Reference-Text-Oriented Allusions.“ Pages 242–53 in Exploring Intertextuality: Diverse Strategies for New Testament Interpretation of Texts. Edited by B. J. Oropeza and S. Moyise. Eugene, OR: Cascade, 2016.

New Commentary from Doug Wilson

The oft provocative author, Douglas Wilson, has a new commentary on the Pastoral Epistles which will release soon. While I don’t always agree with Wilson (with whom do I always agree?!) I appreciate his writing, wit and straightforwardness. I am looking forward to seeing this book. I don’t understand the widows in 1 Timothy 5 as an “office” (though many do), so I am intrigued to see how he fleshes out his comment here in the video.

 

Pillar of the Truth Book Blurb from Canon Press on Vimeo.

Review: Craig Smith’s New Commentary on 2 Timothy

Sitting on my desk in my “to be read” pile is the recent commentary on 2 Timothy by Craig Smith in the Readings series published by Sheffield Phoenix Press. I am keen to read this commentary because I had the privilege of meeting Craig several years ago and I know of his published thesis which argues for a different take on 2 Timothy. Regarding the letter as authentically Pauline (as I do) Craig argues that 2 Timothy is not a farewell letter but an exhortation to further ministry in which Paul expects to participate.

I was pleased to discover that although I have not yet gotten around to reading this book, Robert Wall has and has provided a review at Review of Biblical Literature. Wall praises Smith’s careful attention to the text and consistent methodology and argumentation. However, he critiques the lack of footnotes and what he finds as a lack of theological reflection on the contemporary meaning of this letter. I agree wholeheartedly with Wall that we must not hold apart exegesis and theological and ecclesial reflection, but, from what I know of Smith, he would also agree. Not having yet read the book myself, I will have to withhold judgment.

This is a helpful review, which has nudged me to get on with reading this book.

 

2 Timothy written in Philippi?

At his Patheos blog, Michael Bird recently cited a lengthy portion from Helmut Koester’s History and Literature of Early Christianity where Koester argues that 2 Timothy (which he takes as pseudonymous) was written from Philippi. After mentioning the various locations Paul refers to in the latter part of the letter, Koester states, “Any glance at a map will show that he thought of Paul as imprisoned in Philippi.” He is not mildly suggesting. See the full section at Bird’s blog.

This depends on the pseudonymity of the letter, of which I am not convinced, but it is intriguing to see this argument. It would be interesting to connect this with the work of Peter Walker who has made fresh arguments for placing the PE within the chronology.

Papers from ETS Group Published in Journal

img_3602We had a great session at the Pastoral Epistles study group at ETS last week with four strong papers. I was pleased to announce in our session that the latest issue of the Southeastern Theological Review has been released and is devoted to the Pastoral Epistles. Most of the articles came from papers previously presented in our study group. Editor, Ben Merkle, has done a wonderful job bringing these together. Here are the contents:

“Kinship, Christian Kinship, and the Letters to Timothy and Titus,” Charles J. Bumgardner

“Divergent, Insurgent or Allegiant? 1 Timothy 5:1-2 and the Nature of God’s Household,” Gregory A. Couser

“Paul’s Family of God: What Familial Language in the Pastorals Can and Cannot Tell Us about the Church,” Gregory J. Stiekes

“Πιστος ὁ λόγος: An Alternative Analysis,” L. Timothy Swinson

“Paul’s Letters to Timothy and Titus: A Literature Review (2009-2015),” Charles J. Bumgardner

“Interview with Ray Van Neste of Union University”

Several of the papers deal with the household and family language of the Pastorals, and I found them particularly helpful. Tim Swinson challenges the typical way of understanding Paul’s use of the phrase “πιστoς ὁ λόγος.” If you’ve been reading this site, you are already aware of Bumgardner’s bibliographic grasp, and his literature review here is quite helpful.

I had the privilege of doing an interview on how the Pastoral Epistles discussing how they have impacted my life, noting some ongoing work and pointing to various ways the church needs the Pastorals specifically today.

Southeastern posts the full journal free online, so I expect it will appear at their website soon.

Update: This issue is now available online. I have also linked the first reference to the journal above to this issue. The website provides a link to the full issue as well as to specific articles.