The Pastorals in JSNT 41.5 Booklist 2019

Each year, the Journal for the Study of the New Testament puts out an issue giving recently-published books in categories related to NT studies. The Pastoral Epistles are a distinct category in the issue each year, and usually garner two or three entries. This year, JSNT highlighted three volumes, each with two-paragraph annotations:

Külling, Heinz. Mann und Frau, Eltern und Kindern als Bewohner ihres Hauses in den Pastoralbriefen. Zurich: Theologischer Verlag Zurich, 2017. (annotation by Peter Oakes)

Perkins, Larry J. The Pastoral Letters: A Handbook on the Greek Text. Baylor Handbook on the Greek New Testament. Waco, TX: Baylor University Press, 2017. (annotation by Tom de Bruin)

Van Nes, Jermo. Pauline Language and the Pastoral Epistles: A Study of Linguistic Variation in the Corpus Paulinum. Linguistic Biblical Studies 16. Leiden: Brill, 2018. (annotation by Dirk Jongkind)

The Spiritual Depository of Paul the Apostle: (Modern-)Greek-Language Edited Volume on the Pastorals

Volumes of collections of essays which are entirely about the Pastorals (in whole or in part) are not common. Until a year or so ago, I was only aware of six:

Bieringer, Reimund, ed. 2 Timothy and Titus Reconsidered / Der 2. Timotheus- und der Titusbrief in neuem Licht. Colloquium Oecumenicum Paulinum 20. Leuven: Peeters, 2018.

de Virgilio, Giuseppe, ed. Il deposito della fede: Timoteo e Tito. Supplementi alla Rivista Biblica 34. Bologna: Dehoniane, 1998.

Donfried, Karl Paul, ed. 1 Timothy Reconsidered. Colloquium Oecumenicum Paulinum 18. Leuven: Peeters, 2008.

Köstenberger, Andreas J. and Terry L. Wilder, eds. Entrusted with the Gospel: Paul’s Theology in the Pastoral Epistles. Nashville: B&H, 2010.

Köstenberger, Andreas J. and Thomas R. Schreiner, eds. Women in the Church: An Interpretation and Application of 1 Timothy 2:9–15. 3rd ed. Wheaton, IL: Crossway, 2016.

Weidemann, Hans-Ulrich, and Wilfried Eisele, eds. Ein Meisterschüler: Titus und sein Brief. Michael Theobald zum 60. Gerburtstag. Stuttgarter Bibelstudien 214. Stuttgart: Katholisches Bibelwerk, 2008.

I was pleased to discover another, a privately printed volume of scholarly presentations from an academic conference on the Pastorals held in Thessaloniki in 2003: Ἡ πνευματική παρακαταθήκη τοῦ Ἀποστόλου Παύλου. Ποιμαντικές Ἐπιστολές [The Spiritual Depository of Paul the Apostle: Pastoral Epistles]. Εἰσηγήσεις ΙΑ´ Συνάξεως Ὀρθοδόξων Βιβλικῶν Θεολόγων: Λευκάδα 25–28 Σεπτεμβρίου 2003 (Thessaloniki: privately published, 2004). A couple of the essays are in English, but most are in Modern Greek (though a number of those have English-language summaries included). The essays are all written by authors who are Orthodox, though not all of them are self-consciously treating the letters from that perspective.

My profound thanks goes to Christos Karakolis, without whose help I would not have been able to obtain this work. Christos is a professor of New Testament at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, and has an essay included in the volume. He graciously provided me a copy of the volume, and assisted with the English translation of the table of contents.

I provide below a list of the essays included in the volume, most of which are well-nigh impossible to obtain through standard channels. Though it would be inappropriate for me to post the entire volume online, researchers in the Pastorals may obtain specific essays on a personal basis for research purposes; email me at chuckbumgardner at gmail.com with your request.

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Agouridis, Savvas (Σαββας Αγουριδης). “Η φύση της αίρεσης που καταπολεμούν οι ποιμαντικές επιστολές [The nature of the sect fought by the Pastoral Epistles].” Pages 31–40.

Atmatzidis, Charalampos (Ατματζιδης, Χαραλαμπος). “Οι ηθικές προτροπές για τον πλούτο και τους πλουσίους στο Α’ Τιμ. 6 και η Καινοδιαθηκική ηθική [The ethical exhortations regarding wealth and the wealthy in 1 Tim. 6 and the ethics of the New Testament].” Pages 41–84. [English-language summary on p. 84]

Vassiliadis, Petros (Βασιλειαδης, Πετρος). “Μετανεωτερικότητα, σταυρική θεολογία και οι συνέπειές τους για τις ποιμαντικές επιστολές [Postmodernity, theologia crucis, and their consequences for the Pastoral Epistles].” Pages 85–100. [English-language summary on pp. 99-100]

Galanis, Ioannis (Γαλανης, Ιωαννης). “Η χρήση των ποιμαντικών επιστολών στα έργα των εκκλησιαστικών συγγραφέων της ανατολικής εκκλησίας [The use of the Pastoral Epistles in the works of ecclesiastical writers in the Eastern Church].” Pages 101–12.

Galitis, Georgios A. (Γαλιτης, Γεωργιος). “Οι ποιμαντικές επιστολές στη σύγχρονη έρευνα [The Pastoral Epistles in modern research].” Pages 113–30.

Despotis, Sotirios (Δεσποτης, Σωτηριος). “Η Χριστολογία των Ποιμαντικών Επιστολών [The Christology of the Pastoral Epistles].” Pages 131–50. [English-language summary on pp. 148–49]

Doikos, Damianos (Δοϊκος, Δαμιανος). “‘Χήρας τίμα τάς όντως χήρας’ (Α’Τιμ.5,3-16).” Pages 151–62.

Ioannidis, Thomas (Ιωαννιδης, Θωμας). “Οι ύστεροι καιροί και οι έσχατες ημέρες στις Α’ και Β’ προς Τιμόθεον επιστολές [The end of all times and the last days in the First and Second Epistles to Timothy].” Pages 163–92. [English-language summary on pp. 189–91]

Karavidopoulos, Johannes (Καραβιδοπουλος, Ιωαννης). “Η σωτηριολογία των ποιμαντικών επιστολώ [The soteriology of the Pastoral Epistles].” Pages 193–204. [English-language summary on p. 203]

Karakolis, Christos (Καρακολης, Χρηστος). “‘Λέγοντες την ανάστασιν ήδη γεγονέναι’ (Β΄ Τιμ. 2,18): Ερμηνευτική, συγκριτική και θεολογική θεώρηση μιας εσχατολογικής παρεκτροπής [‘Saying that the resurrection has already happened’ (2 Timothy 2:18): Exegetical, comparative and theological view of an eschatological deviation].” Pages 205–24.

Kirov, Dimitar Popmarinov. “Godlessness according to 2 Timothy 3.1–9 and Ps. 13(14). Some biblical and theological attitudes in the light of the situation in a postcommunist country.” Pages 225–40. [Greek-language summary on pp. 238–40]

Koltsiou-Nikita, Anna (Κόλτσιου-Νικήτα, Άννα). “To ‘κάτοπτρον επισκόπου’ στις ποιμαντικές επιστολές και το γραμματειακό του πλαίσιο [The ‘mirror of the bishop’ in the Pastoral Epistles and its literary context].” Pages 241–64. [German-language summary on p. 264]

Mihoc, Vasile. “The Mission in the Pastoral Letters.” Pages 265–86. [Greek-language summary on pp. 284–85]

Nikolakopoulos, Constantine (Νικολακοπουλος, Κωνσταντινος). “Επόψεις της ‘Παυλείου’ ρητορικής στις δυο προς Τιμόθεον επιστολές [Aspects of ‘Pauline’ rhetoric in the two letters to Timothy].” Pages 287–304

Papademetriou, Kyriakoula (Παπαδημητριου, Κυρiακουλα). “Η σημασιολογία της λ. υγιαίνω στις ποιμαντικές επιστολές [The semantics of the word υγιαίνω in the Pastoral Epistles].” Pages 305–34. [English-language summary on p. 333]

Paparnakis, Athanasios (Παπαρνακης, Αθανασιος). “‘’Από βρέφους τά ιερά γράμματα οίδας’ (Β’ Τιμ. 3,15). Η θρησκευτική αγωγή του παιδιού στον ιουδαϊσμ [‘From childhood you have been acquainted with the sacred writings’ (2 Tim 3:15). Religious education of children in Judaism].” Pages 335–60. [English-language summary on p. 360]

Sakkos, Stergios N. (Σακκος, Στεργιος Ν.). “Ενα εκκλησιαστικο αξιωμα για τη γυναικα (Α’ Τιμ. 5,3–16) [An ecclesiastical office for women (1 Tim 5:3–16)].” Pages 361–85.

Merz contra Winter

Among the many literary accomplishments of Bruce Winter, onetime warden of Tyndale House and presently professor emeritus at Queensland Theological College, is his engagement of the connection between the Pastorals and their Greco-Roman cultural context. Published works in this regard include:

“The ‘New’ Roman Wife and 1 Timothy 2:9–15: The Search for a Sitz im Leben.” Tyndale Bulletin 51.2 (2000): 285–94.

Providentia for the Widows of 1 Timothy 5.3–16.” Tyndale Bulletin 39 (1988): 83–99.

Roman Wives, Roman Widows: The Appearance of New Women and the Pauline Communities. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2003. [esp. pp. 97–169 on 1 Tim 2:9–15; 5:11–15; Titus 2:3–5]

“You Were What You Wore in Roman Law: Deciphering the Dress Codes of 1 Timothy 2:9–15.” SBL Forum, n.p. Online.

In Roman Wives, Roman Widows (see, e.g., this review for a general summary), Winter sets forth his understanding of the “new woman” in the Greco-Roman context of the NT, making application to Pauline passages such as 1 Tim 2:9-15 and 1 Tim 5:3-16. As a matter of definition, “The ‘new’ wife or widow in the late Roman Republic and early Empire was the one whose social life was reported to have been pursued at the expense of family responsibilities that included the complex running of households” (5). Winter lays out literary evidence from “(a) the views of contemporary writers covering the late Republic and the early second century A.D.; (b) those of the poets and playwrights; (c) and the legal moves of Augustus where he specifically legislates against this new phenomenon in the late Republican period and the early Empire” (22). He finds that this evidence supports “new mores” of the time which had implications for the social roles of women and “in some cases, endorsed [the ‘new woman’s] illicit sexual liaisons with younger, single men” (3). The “new woman” was characterized by provocative clothing and a loose lifestyle, in contrast with properly modest wives and widows.

Winter’s work has been widely engaged. It plays a significant role, for instance, in Towner’s NICNT commentary on the Pastorals. It has not been, however, uncontroversial. To that end, I point our readership to a just-published, and rather severe, critique: Annette Merz, “‘New’ Woman? Bruce W. Winters These und ihre Rezeption in der exegetischen Diskussion kritisch beleuchtet [Bruce W. Winter’s thesis and its reception in the exegetical discussion critically examined],” in Frauen im antiken Judentum und frühen Christentum (ed. Jörg Frey and Nicole Rupschus; WUNT 2/489; Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2019), 209-34. Merz has posted a teaser on Academia, providing her faculty email address (a.b.merz@pthu.nl) for readers to obtain a copy of the entire essay.

In her lengthy discussion, Merz contends that Winter reads the ancient evidence too uncritically; appropriates modern historians too selectively and feminist scholarship too rarely; and unduly expands a limited phenomenon of antiquity beyond historically verifiable chronological and geographical bounds. She considers his overall thesis “dubious” (“dubiose,” p. 231), indeed, an “evangelical research-myth” (“ein evangelikaler Forschungsmythos,” p. 234).

My purpose in noting Winter’s and Merz’s work here is not to evaluate either, but simply to highlight the discussion. If students of the Pastorals are leaning heavily on Winter’s work in some particular project or if Winter’s thesis undergirds their understanding of the letters to any great extent, they will at least want to be aware of Merz’s substantial critique.

Van Nes, Pauline Language and the Pastoral Epistles

Cover Pauline Language and the Pastoral Epistles

Van Neste reviews van Nes. In the current issue of the Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society, Ray Van Neste provides a 1000-word evaluation of the recent and important Jermo van Nes, Pauline Language and the Pastoral Epistles: A Study of Linguistic Variation in the Corpus Paulinum. Linguistic Biblical Studies 16. Leiden: Brill, 2018. [Brill description; N.B.! The very valuable appendices — over 250 pages worth of data — are open access through the Brill page: “Hapax Legomena in the Corpus Paulinum“; “Lexical Richness in the Corpus Paulinum“; “Missing Indeclinables in the Corpus Paulinum“; “Interclausal Relations in the Corpus Paulinum“; “Structure Irregularities in the Corpus Paulinum.” Not to mention van Nes’s extensive bibliography.]

“It would be difficult to overstate the significance of this contribution to the study of the Pastoral Epistles.”

Read the entire review here.

Reviews

Linda Maloney has served English-speaking students of the Pastorals by providing in CBQ a summary and review of Michael Theobald, Israel-Vergessenheit in den Pastoralbriefen: Ein neuer Vorschlag zu ihrer historisch-theologischen Verortung im 2. Jahrhundert. n. Chr. unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der Ignatius-Briefe (Stuttgarter Bibelstudien 229. Stuttgart: Katholisches Bibelwerk, 2016). For Maloney, “this book is a mine of precious information and analysis.” You can find the first page of the review here.

Within the last year, Mark Harding has posted a positive review at RBL of T. Christopher Hoklotubbe, Civilized Piety: The Rhetoric of Pietas in the Pastoral Epistles and the Roman Empire (Waco, TX: Baylor University Press, 2017). (full review available to SBL members only)

On RBL’s site, I note there are four volumes of interest up for review by SBL members:
(1) The just-published dissertation by Nathan Nzyoka Joshua, Benefaction and Patronage in Leadership: A Socio-Historical Exegesis of the Pastoral Epistles (Carlisle, Cumbria, UK: Langham, 2018).
(2) Jermo van Nes’s recent dissertation, Pauline Language and the Pastoral Epistles: A Study of Linguistic Variation in the Corpus Paulinum (Linguistic Biblical Studies 16; Leiden: Brill, 2018).
(3) Larry J. Perkins, The Pastoral Letters: A Handbook on the Greek Text (Baylor Handbook on the Greek New Testament; Waco, TX: Baylor University Press, 2017).
(4) Robert W. Yarbrough, The Letters to Timothy and Titus. Pillar New Testament Commentary (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2018).

Additions to “Forthcoming Publications on the Pastorals”

We have additions to make to our previous post on forthcoming publications on the Pastoral Epistles. We’ve edited that post accordingly, but want to highlight the additions here.

Houwelingen, P. H. R. (Rob) van. “Power, Powerlessness, and Authorised Power in 1 Timothy 2:8–15.” Forthcoming in Power in the New Testament. Edited by A. B. Merz and P. G. R. de Villiers. Leuven: Peeters, 2019 or 2020 projected. This essay is presently available here, along with a summary of its contents.

Lappenga, Benjamin, and David Downs. These authors have a chapter-length treatment of 2 Timothy in a forthcoming [September] 2019 volume on pistis in connection with the exalted Christ in Paul’s writings. From Lappenga: “The opening chapter on 2 Timothy introduces the volume by showing the overwhelming consensus among interpreters who hold to a subjective element of the phrase pistis Christou that Jesus’s pistis is demonstrated principally, if not exclusively, in his suffering and death on the cross. We establish the first challenge to this consensus through a close reading of 2 Tim 2:8-13. Here we demonstrate that to speak of the faithfulness of Christ in 2 Timothy is primarily to speak of the fidelity of the risen Lord, who will ensure the eschatological salvation of those who are ‘in Christ.'”

Maier, Harry. “The Entrepreneurial Widows of 1 Timothy.” In Women, Christianity, and Judaism. Edited by Ilaria Ramelli and Joan Taylor. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2020 projected. An early draft of the essay may be found here, along with a summary description. From the author: “This essay revisits the instructions in 1 Timothy concerning the exhortations for widows (a term in Greek that designates both previously married and unmarried women) younger than 65 to (re)marry. It locates the instruction in the Roman economy in which women were artisans who controlled their assets and it argues that the Pastor’s concern is that women not function as patrons of meetings. Consideration of laws of inheritance and control of property in marriage helps in understanding the instruction single and widowed women to (re)marry. The pastor wants to assure that the control of property be ceded to husbands, in this case to Christian men whom the Pastor entrusts with sole authority to lead Christ assemblies. The essay thus seeks to understand the rule concerning (re)marriage through consideration of the creation of social agency the economy of the Roman Empire offered businesswomen.”

Additions to “2018 Publications on the Pastorals”

Several 2018 publications have come to our attention since we posted an earlier list. We’ve edited the previous post accordingly, but we note here the additions to the list:

Blomberg, Craig L. A New Testament Theology. Waco, TX: Baylor University Press, 2018. [note chap. 8, “The Pastoral Epistles,” pp. 455–95]

Ehrensperger, Kathy. “Διδάσκαλος ἐθνῶν—Pauline Trajectories According to 1 Timothy.” Pages 88–104 in The Early Reception of Paul the Second Temple Jew: Text, Narrative and Reception History. Edited by Isaac W. Oliver and Gabriele Boccaccini with Joshua Scott. Library of Second Temple Studies 92. London: Bloomsbury T&T Clark, 2019. [e-book version released in 2018] Online publisher description. From the volume forward: “Ehrensperger examines the depiction of Paul in 1 Timothy as the
διδάσκαλος ἐθνῶν, which, she contends, stands in clear succession of Paul’s self-presentation in the undisputed letters as the ἀπόστολος ἐθνῶν. By remembering Paul as the διδάσκαλος ἐθνῶν, 1 Timothy can develop a number of issues that Paul addressed to the ἔθνη in Christ. Similarly to the undisputed Pauline letters, the guidance provided in 1 Timothy is clearly envisioned as rooted in Jewish traditions in as much as these are applied to ἔθνη. The advice provided, in other words, is specific rather than universally addressed to all who are in Christ. With this framework in mind, Ehrensperger discusses those passages in 1 Timothy that deal with widows. She argues that the concern for widows in 1 Timothy is seen as part of the obligation to ‘remember the poor’ in analogy to contemporary Jewish practice based on traditional notions of social justice (צדקה), which are applied to the ἐκκλησίαι ἐθνῶν.”

Herzer, Jens. “Paulustradition Und Paulusrezeption In Den Pastoralbriefen.” In Receptions of Paul in Early Christianity: The Person of Paul and His Writings Through the Eyes of His Early Interpreters. Edited by Jens Schröter, Simon Butticaz, and Andreas Dettwiler. Beihefte zur Zeitschrift für die neutestamentliche Wissenschaft 234. Berlin: de Gruyter, 2018. De Gruyter volume description. Abstract: “The place of the Pastoral Epistles within the collection of Pauline letters depends decisively on two aspects: the assessment of their relation to Paul himself as well as to the other letters, and the evaluation of their literary character. Depending on these variables, the concepts of tradition, transmission, transformation, and reception are no longer sharply defined but instead represent aspects of a complex discourse. Within this discourse, each of the Pastorals has its own character: 1 Timothy reveals a relation to Paul and the Pauline tradition that is different to those in Titus and 2 Timothy. Therefore, each of these three letters shows a specific profile with regard to both the reception of Paul (or Pauline ideas) and the definition of Pauline tradition.”

Joshua, Nathan Nzyoka. Benefaction and Patronage in Leadership: A Socio-Historical Exegesis of the Pastoral Epistles. Carlisle, Cumbria, UK: Langham, 2018. Publisher’s description.

Kaiser, Ursula Ulrike. Die Rede von “Wiedergeburt” im Neuen Testament: Ein metapherntheoretisch orientierter Neuansatz nach 100 Jahren Forschungsgeschichte. Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament 413. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2018. [Significant discussions of Titus 3:5] Publisher volume description.

Karaman, Elif Hilal. Ephesian Women in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Perspective. Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament 2/474. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2018. Publisher volume description.

Maier, Harry O. “Marcion the Circumcizer.” Pages 97–108 in Marcion of Sinope as Religious Entrepreneur. Edited by Markus Vinzent. Studia Patristica 99. Leuven: Peeters, 2018. Online volume description. Abstract: “A chief element against the view that the pseudonymous Pastorals (1 and 2 Timothy and Titus) polemicize against Marcion is the association of opponents with Judaism. The essay addresses this apparent contradiction through an analysis of Tit. 1:10, where the author represents the opposition as ‘of the circumcision.’ The article argues that the reference is a rhetorical charge against Marcion as guilty of promoting community discord. Paul’s report of Gal. 1:18-2:14 was important to Marcion as an account of the apostle’s dedication to his revealed Gospel against opponents in/from Jerusalem. Acts, perhaps motivated by an anti-Marcionite polemic, represents an alternative account, not of Paul opposed by Jerusalem Christ followers, but endorsed by them. The essay observes how Irenaeus and Tertullian in opposition to Marcion seek to harmonize the report from Acts and the confrontation of Paul with Peter in Gal. 2:10-14, to show how Paul never separated from the other disciples, but was instructed by them. The Pastorals polemicize against Marcion in a different way by turning the tables on him and associating him with ‘false brethren’ (Gal. 2:4) and the ‘circumcision party’ (Gal. 2:12; Acts 11:2; 15:2) opposed to Paul’s Gospel. As such they pillory their opponent as a factionalist and thus use the unique accounts reported in Galatians, so important to Marcion, against him.”

Rambiert-Kwasniewska, Anna. “Mąż jednej żony? [Husband of one wife?] (1 Tm 3,2).” Nowe Życie 35 (2018): 6/518, 12-13.

Thurén, Lauri. “Divine Headhunting? The Function of the Qualifications of Deacons in 1 Tim 3:8–13.” Pages 117–30 in Deacons and Diakonia in Early Christianity. Edited by Bart J. Koet, Edwina Murphy, and Esko Ryökäs. Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament 2/479. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2018.

Forthcoming Publications on the Pastoral Epistles

In a recent post, we looked back at the last year’s publications on the Pastorals. Here, we’ll take a look at some forthcoming titles — expected publications whose date of release ranges from less than a month away to over a decade in the future. Most are monograph-length publications, with a few others sprinkled in for good measure. My deep thanks goes to a number of authors who helpfully were able to provide a short description of their work, and publishers who responded to inquiries about forthcoming titles! If you are aware of other forthcoming academic work on the Pastorals, please leave a comment.

The list given below is provided in pdf format (hyperlinks included) here.

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Beale, Gregory K., and Christopher Beetham. Volume on the Pastorals in the Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, forthcoming 2022. From the author: “The contribution of the commentary will be in the area of the use of the OT in the Pastoral Epistles.”

Cover image for The Law’s Universal Condemning and Enslaving Power: Reading Paul, the Old Testament, and Second Temple Jewish Literature By Bryan Blazosky

Blazosky, Bryan. The Law’s Universal Condemning and Enslaving Power. BBRSup 24. Winona Lake, IN: Eisenbrauns, forthcoming [June] 2019. Publisher’s synopsis. From the author: “In spite of the wealth of literature on Paul’s view of the Mosaic law’s relationship to Gentile Christians, little has been written about how the law relates to Gentile unbelievers. This book examines whether Paul teaches that Gentiles are condemned by and enslaved under the law. Furthermore, this study explores the logic of Paul’s approach and compares his view on this issue to views found in the Old Testament and Second Temple Jewish literature. As far as the contribution of this book to the Pastoral Epistles, on the one hand, I only cover one section of the Pastoral Epistles (1 Timothy 1:8–11) in part of one chapter (the chapter on Pauline writings outside of Galatians and Romans). On the other hand, I intentionally address 1 Timothy 1:8–11 because it is so relevant to the topic of Gentile condemnation and the law of Moses and also because this text is so often overlooked in Paul and the law studies simply because it’s in the Pastoral Epistles. In my treatment of this text, I examine what Paul means by νομίμως in 1 Timothy 1:8, Paul’s extensive allusion to the Decalogue in 1 Timothy 1:9–10, and Paul’s argument that one of the proper uses of the Mosaic law is to use it to expose and condemn the lawless.”

Bray, Gerald. Bray’s work on the Pastorals will appear in the International Theological Commentary, a newer series produced as a sort of companion series to the International Critical Commentary. ITC series webpage.

Brown, Michael I. 2 Timothy. Lectio Continua Expository Commentary on the New Testament. Dallas, GA: Tolle Lege, forthcoming.

Dodson, Joseph R. “Paul, the Pastor, and the Gift.” In Christian Origins and the Formation of the Early Church. Edited by Stanley Porter and Andrew Pitts. TENTS/ECHC 5. Leiden: Brill, forthcoming 2019 or 2020. From the author: “This essay is a modified version of a paper I delivered in San Antonio at ETS in 2016. It is a response to John M. G. Barclay’s Paul and the Gift. In that monograph, Barclay admits that his conclusions might be different if he included all of the letters ascribed to Paul, and perhaps Barclay’s promised sequel will include these other epistles. Until then, I offer this essay as an initial attempt to apply Barclay’s heuristic model beyond the undisputed letters. Therefore, I select the most relevant passages from the Pastoral Epistles regarding God’s grace-gift (1 Tim 1:12–17; 2 Tim 1:8–12; and Titus 2:11–3:8) and investigate them in view of Barclay’s six perfections on the one hand and in light of Barclay’s conclusions on the other.” 

Ebojo, Edgar Battad. “A Scribe and His Manuscript: An Investigation into the Scribal Habits of Papyrus 46 (p. Chester Beatty ii – p. Mich. Inv. 6238).” PhD thesis, University of Birmingham, 2014. The question of whether the LTT could have been part of P46 receives extended attention on pp. 204–35.
The author plans to publish the work, though no immediate plans have been made for publication; the quality of the work, however, suggests there will be no problem in finding a publisher. In the meantime, the thesis is publicly available here and supplemental information here.

Fitzgerald, John T. The Pastoral Epistles: A Commentary. Hermeneia. Minneapolis: Fortress, forthcoming. Fitzgerald’s work will replace the important Dibelius/Conzelmann volume in Hermeneia, and is slated for release in the late 2020s, over 50 years after its predecessor’s publication. Anyone familiar with Fitzgerald’s previous publications will rightly expect his Pastorals commentary to give special attention to the letters as distinctly Christian documents within the broader context of the Greco-Roman world.

Gatiss, Lee, and Bradley G. Green. These two scholars are preparing the volume on the Pastorals in the Reformation Commentary on Scripture series. Downers Grove, IL: IVP Academic, forthcoming 2019.

Hall, David W. 1 Timothy. Lectio Continua Expository Commentary on the New Testament. Dallas, GA: Tolle Lege, forthcoming.

Epiphanies of the Divine in the Septuagint and the New Testament

Herzer, Jens. “The Epiphany of God and the Coming of the Messiah: Reading the Septuagint with the Pastoral Epistles.” In Epiphanies of the Divine in the Septuagint and the New Testament: V. International Symposium of the Corpus Judaeo-Hellenisticum Novi Testamenti, 14–17 May 2015, Nottingham. Edited by Roland Deines and Mark Wreford. Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, forthcoming 2019. Publisher volume description.

Houwelingen, P. H. R. (Rob) van. “Power, Powerlessness, and Authorised Power in 1 Timothy 2:8–15.” Forthcoming in Power in the New Testament. Edited by A. B. Merz and P. G. R. de Villiers. Leuven: Peeters, 2019 or 2020 projected. This essay is presently available here, along with a summary of its contents.

Hultgren, Arland J. “The Pastoral Epistles and the Scriptures of Israel.” In Paul and Scripture. Edited by Stanley E. Porter and Christopher D. Land. Pauline Studies 10. Leiden: Brill, [February] 2019.

Hutson, Christopher R. The Pastoral Epistles. Paideia Commentaries. Grand Rapids: Baker, forthcoming [November] 2019. Publisher’s description: “Among commentaries on the Pastoral Epistles, this one is distinctive for its emphasis on ministerial formation. While considering the particular features of each individual letter, Hutson reads these three letters collectively as an epistolary handbook for young ministers. The ‘Theological Issues’ sections often discuss how aspects of these letters inform Christian ministry.
“Hutson’s exegetical analysis explores how the letters reflect an early Christian community still close to its Jewish roots and living in a Greco-Roman society that is always uncomprehending and often hostile. He applies James Scott’s ‘hidden transcript’ theory to show how Pastoral Paul’s advice helped Christian communities deflect suspicion and establish positive engagement with the wider society. Hutson’s approach is fruitful for understanding ethical issues in these letters, including teachings about slavery, women, and the ethical expectations of Christian leaders. At the same time, Hutson resists a hermeneutic of suspicion that views these letters as hopelessly patriarchal and written to inculcate Roman domestic values as normative for Christian churches. Hutson mounts robust arguments against discrimination on the basis of gender, ethnicity, or social class, but he does so from the Christological and eschatological warrants that he finds to be driving the letters.
“Theological reflections are broadly ecumenical, drawing insights from Orthodox, Catholic, Anglican, Methodist, Reformed, Pietist, Pentecostal, and other traditions to show how Christians from various periods and contexts have understood and applied these letters. The goal is to open up a deep well of resources from which ministers can draw as they seek to engage new challenges in the twenty-first century.”

Jeon, Paul. 2 Timothy. Eugene, OR: Pickwick, 2020 projected.

Langford, Andrew M. Langford’s 2018 University of Chicago dissertation, “Diagnosing Deviance: Pathology and Polemic in the Pastoral Epistles,” was supervised by Margaret M. Mitchell. Several factors suggest its eventual publication, so I include here the abstract provided at ProQuest: “This dissertation argues that the single, post-Pauline author of the Pastoral Epistles crafts a stigmatizing depiction of his theological opponents by spatializing, demonizing, and pathologizing their alleged deviance in order to provide an authoritative model for how to address unwanted diversity in teaching, community norms, church governance, and the interpretation of Paul’s letters in the post-Pauline era. It demonstrates that the Pastor creatively synthesizes diverse sources, pursuing his agenda both through creative acts of authorial fiction that draw upon key themes and terms from the Pauline homologoumena and through the appropriation of language and ideas from contemporary philosophical and medical discourses. This dissertation contributes new insights on the traditional problem of opponents in the Pastorals by 1) identifying and interpreting hitherto under-appreciated narrative devices like the spatializing of deviance and obedience, 2) demonstrating through research in ancient medical literature that the Pastor’s use of medical imagery is more pervasive and cohesive than previously thought, 3) arguing for the necessity of interpreting the Pastor’s pathologizing of deviance in light of ancient disease etiologies and models of corporeality, 4) demonstrating the pervasiveness and function of the rhetoric of mental illness (itself a culturally constructed category drawn upon polemically by the Pastor) with insights from disability studies, and 5) drawing upon recent interpretive insights about the function of authorial fiction and “corrective composition” to demonstrate that the Pastor is self-consciously appropriating particular moments in the Pauline epistolary in order to craft a backwards and forward-looking approach to the problem of opponents per se in the Pastoral Epistles. This dissertation constitutes another contributing argument for the unified composition of these letters as a mini-corpus designed to supplement an emerging corpus of Paul’s letters.”

Lappenga, Benjamin, and David Downs. These authors have a chapter-length treatment of 2 Timothy in a forthcoming [September] 2019 volume on pistis in connection with the exalted Christ in Paul’s writings. From Lappenga: “The opening chapter on 2 Timothy introduces the volume by showing the overwhelming consensus among interpreters who hold to a subjective element of the phrase pistis Christou that Jesus’s pistis is demonstrated principally, if not exclusively, in his suffering and death on the cross. We establish the first challenge to this consensus through a close reading of 2 Tim 2:8-13. Here we demonstrate that to speak of the faithfulness of Christ in 2 Timothy is primarily to speak of the fidelity of the risen Lord, who will ensure the eschatological salvation of those who are ‘in Christ.'”

MacLean, Malcolm. Titus and Philemon. Lectio Continua Expository Commentary on the New Testament. Dallas, GA: Tolle Lege, forthcoming.

Maier, Harry. “The Entrepreneurial Widows of 1 Timothy.” In Women, Christianity, and Judaism. Edited by Ilaria Ramelli and Joan Taylor. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2020 projected. An early draft of the essay may be found here, along with a summary description. From the author: “This essay revisits the instructions in 1 Timothy concerning the exhortations for widows (a term in Greek that designates both previously married and unmarried women) younger than 65 to (re)marry. It locates the instruction in the Roman economy in which women were artisans who controlled their assets and it argues that the Pastor’s concern is that women not function as patrons of meetings. Consideration of laws of inheritance and control of property in marriage helps in understanding the instruction single and widowed women to (re)marry. The pastor wants to assure that the control of property be ceded to husbands, in this case to Christian men whom the Pastor entrusts with sole authority to lead Christ assemblies. The essay thus seeks to understand the rule concerning (re)marriage through consideration of the creation of social agency the economy of the Roman Empire offered businesswomen.”

Frauen im antiken Judentum und frühen Christentum

Merz, Annette. “‘New’ Woman? Bruce W. Winters These und ihre Rezeption in der exegetischen Diskussion kritisch beleuchtet.” Pages 209-34 in Frauen im antiken Judentum und frühen Christentum. Edited by Jörg Frey and Nicole Rupschus. WUNT 2. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, forthcoming [May] 2019. Publisher volume description.

Merz, Annette. Merz is preparing for publication an expanded English-language version of her article “Gen(de)red power: Die Macht des Genres im Streit um die Frauenrolle in Pastoralbriefen und Paulusakten.” HTS Teologiese Studies 68.1 (2012): 71–80.

Nel, Marius. 1–2 Timothy, Titus. The Story of God Bible Commentary. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, forthcoming.

Pao, David W. Volume on the Pastorals in the Brill Exegetical Commentary Series. Leiden: Brill, forthcoming 2020 or 2021. According to Brill, this new commentary series is projected to launch at the end of 2019, so Pao’s volume should be one of the first published in the series. From the author: “There will be five major sections for each paragraph of biblical text: translation, text-critical analysis, grammatical analysis, historical analysis, and theological analysis. Unique to this series is close interaction with the Greek text, informed by recent developments in the study of the Greek language.”

Porter, Stanley E. Pastoral Epistles. Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. Grand Rapids, Baker: forthcoming. From the author: “This commentary approaches the Pastoral Epistles as letters written by the apostle Paul. Several of the distinctives are consideration of issues surrounding time and place of authorship, appraisal of the influence of context upon interpretation of what Paul writes, and a fuller consideration of issues of language than contained in most commentaries. As a result of such considerations, there are a number of new readings of passages offered that attempt to break out of some interpretations that are grounded more in tradition than they are in the language of the text.”

Smith, Andrew. Smith is working on the Pastorals in the Editio Critica Maior project. He contributed this information about his work: “I estimate the editorial work for the ECM edition of the Pastoral Epistles should take 3-5 years. However, there are a number of factors that make an estimate difficult: (1) we are using a larger data set than the other ECM project teams (~300 manuscripts), at least for the collation step (i.e., not all of these manuscripts will make it to the apparatus); (2) the schedules for the versionists’ work may not align well with this project (that may cause a delay); and (3) we’re the first project team that has no central meeting place for an editorial board (such as the INTF).”

Stanley, Steve. 1 & 2 Timothy, Titus. Evangelical Exegetical Commentary.

Van Neste, Ray. Van Neste is working on the Pastorals volume in the Exegetical Guide to the Greek New Testament series. Nashville: B&H Academic, forthcoming.

Wieland, George. “Sin and Its Remedy in the Pastoral Epistles.” Wieland will be contributing this chapter to a publication (edited by John Goodrich and Nijay Gupta) which collects and supplements the work of a recent IBR study group on Sin and Its Remedy in Paul. Projected publication date: 2019.

Zamfir, Korinna. “Eusebeia, Sōtēria and Civic Loyalty in the Pastoral Epistles.” In “Make Disciples of All Nations”: The Appeal and Authority of Christian Faith in Hellenistic-Roman Times. Edited by Loren T. Stuckenbruck, Beth Langstaff, and Michael Tilly. Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament 2/482. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, forthcoming [March] 2019. Publisher volume description.

In addition to the above publications, Jermo van Nes is editing the presentations from the recent conference held in Leuven, Belgium (program) titled “The Pastoral Epistles: Common Themes, Individual Compositions?” They are forthcoming in an issue of Journal for the Study of Paul and His Letters.

Additionally, the proceedings of the Mainz “Ethics in Titus” conference, organized by Ruben Zimmermann and Dogara Ishaya Manomi, are planned for publication in the WUNT series.

Bob Yarbrough: 5 Big Surprises in the PE

At the Eerdmans blog, there is a recent post where Bob Yarbrough, author of the recent Pillar Commentary on the Pastorals, answers the question, “As you worked through the biblical text, what surprised you?”

I resonate with Bob’s answers. The points aren’t particularly surprising to many (including Bob, I suppose) who have worked with the Pastorals for years, but they are contradictory to prevailing opinions about these valuable letters. This is a great little piece, and I encourage you to read it.

Thanks to Chuck Bumgardner for the heads up on this piece.

Free Commentary

The free book of the month this month from Logos is Aída Spencer’s New Covenant Commentary: 2 Timothy and Titus