De as a Discourse Marker in 2 Timothy

I have mentioned previously the new section on the Pastorals which will begin this year at ETS.

It is often helpful to note other Pastoral Epistles related papers which are scheduled for ETS or SBL this year. I will be giving a paper in the Biblical Greek Language and Linguistics section titled “De as a Discourse Marker in 2 Timothy.” The other people involved in this session (Levinsohn, Runge, Sims, Westfall) are leading thinkers in linguistics and biblical studies, so I face this with some trepidation. I am sure I do not have the final word on de, but I have learned a lot in working on this paper. I hope it will contribute to the discussion on the Pastorals and our understanding of connectives.

Feel free to note other Pastorals related papers scheduled for these conferences in the comments. I hope to see many of you there.

Second Timothy Notes, all in one PDF file

If you’ve been following my series on Translating Second Timothy, you know that I’ve made it through the epistle. (In less than three months, not bad, huh?)


I’ve gathered all of the posts into one PDF file. Grab it if you’re interested. If you have further interest in the material (specifically in distributing it or publishing it in some way) please contact me for further information.



I’m very interested in any feedback you may have. Feel free to email me at rick at pastoral epistles dot com with any comments, encouragement, criticism or flat-out disagreement.

The Gospel Coalition 2009 National Conference

The Gospel Coalition (which I am not affiliated with) recently held their 2009 National Conference. The theme was Entrusted With The Gospel: Living the Vision of 2 Timothy. They’ve recently posted audio of all plenary sessions, which are supposed to “expound the book of Second Timothy”.


This is interesting to me because I’m working through my own analysis and translation of Second Timothy (here, if you’re interested).


Below is the overview from the conference web site:



The theme of this Conference gets to the heart of the book of Second Timothy. As Paul is mentoring a young Timothy, he is communicating the great privilege of proclaiming the gospel to the world. In an age bereft of courageous leadership, declining biblical literacy, and rising cultural accommodation, a prophetic voice from the center is needed, a voice that faithfully speaks the ancient text to our contemporary context. This Conference seeks a renewal of faithful preaching that is rooted in the Scriptures and centered on the gospel.


The best of gospel-faithful ministry is not only taught, it is also caught. This was the practice of the Apostle Paul — the great missionary of the early church — who not only had much to say regarding what constitutes gospel-faithful ministry, but also had much to show of what it looked like in an individual life and in the life of the church. We see these two foci coming together harmoniously in Paul’s letter to the church in Corinth:


Therefore I urge you to imitate me. For this reason I am sending to you Timothy, my son whom I love, who is faithful in the Lord. He will remind you of my way of life in Christ Jesus, which agrees with what I teach everywhere in every church (1 Corinthians 4:16-17; cf. 11:1; Philippians 3:17).


On 21-23 April 2009, The Gospel Coalition will hold its second National Conference on the theme, “Entrusted with the Gospel: Living the Vision of Second Timothy.” During these meetings we will seek to imitate Paul’s dual practice of show and tell.


The Plenary Sessions — led by John Piper, Phil Ryken, Mark Driscoll, K. Edward Copeland, Bryan Chapell, and Ligon Duncan — will expound the book of Second Timothy. It is through these expositions that we hope to model the sort of preaching through Scripture of which the church is in need, while teaching the glories of this gospel of the blessed God that has been entrusted to the care of the church. Tim Keller and Don Carson will each give addresses that seek to situate gospel-faithful ministry in the currents of the twenty-first century, and Ajith Fernando will discuss the global challenges and priorities of gospel-faithful mission for the next Christendom. There will also be several workshops devoted to the faithful appropriation of text (Scripture) to context (contemporary issues).


I’ve not listened to any of the audio, but you may find it helpful.

Translating Second Timothy

I think I’m going to begin something that I may or may not finish. I always hesitate announcing a new “series” because I may never finish the series. But, I find myself thinking about Second Timothy now, and thinking about an analysis and discussion of the text.


One initial step I take in thinking about a text is to translate it. But I don’t just translate, I also think about the structure of the text. When I did this for the Didache awhile back, I ended up with what I called a “Phrasal Interlinear“. I’m starting the same thing with Second Timothy. I may or may not finish. (Update: Finished on May 3, 2009.) The good news is that I already translated Second Timothy five or six years ago, though it needs some work.


Posts



Consulted Resources


I’d be stupid not to consult existing resources for this sort of thing. And there are many. Here are a few of the best. Thankfully, I have all of these (except for Comfort’s new textual commentary) in Logos Bible Software.


Texts


Runge, Steven. The Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament. Logos Bible Software. (Uses UBS4 text as primary, includes in-context glosses from the Lexham Greek-English Interlinear New Testament)


Porter, O’Donnell, Reed, Tan. The OpenText.org Syntactically Analyzed Greek New Testament: Clause Analysis. Logos Bible Software.


Commentaries


Knight, George. $amz(0802823955 Pastoral Epistles) (NIGTC). Eerdmans.


Marshall, I. Howard. $amz(0567084558 A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Pastoral Epistles). T&T Clark.


Mounce, William. $amz(0849902452 Pastoral Epistles) (Word Biblical Commentary, Vol. 46). Thomas Nelson


Towner, Philip. $amz(0802825133 The Letters to Timothy and Titus) (NICNT). Eerdmans


Lexicons


BDAG, LSJ, Louw Nida.


Monographs


Van Neste, Ray. $amz(0567083373 Structure and Cohesion in the Pastoral Epistles). Sheffield Academic.


Text-Critical Material


NA27 apparatus


Comfort, Philip W. $amz(141431034X New Testament Text and Translation Commentary). Tyndale.


Metzger, Bruce W. $amz(1598561642 Textual Commentary on the Greek New Testament). United Bible Societies

Conference Exposition of 2 Timothy

On a more popular level, I notice that the Gospel Coalition conference next Spring will focus on an exposition of 2 Timothy.  The conference theme is “Entrusted with the Gospel: Living the Vision of Second Timothy.”  You can follow the link to see the speakers and which text each one will have.  The sessions work progressively through the letter.


This sounds like a good conference and it is encouraging to see such a setting mining the riches of this wonderful letter.


HT: James Grant

The manuscript . . .

The manuscript for my commentary, Reading Paul’s Letters to Individuals: A Literary and Theological Commentary on the Letters to Philemon, Titus, and Timothy, is officially in the mail to Smyth and Helwys.

S&H expects the commentary to be available in October, just in time for SBL. Maybe I’ll need to go to Boston after all.

This is the commentary that Glenn Hinson was supposed to write, then Marty Soards. Both ended up not filling the contract. Then Hulitt Gloer wrote a manuscript, but was not able to finish it for health reasons.

So in January–you may recall–the editor of the series, Charles Talbert (who was my doctorfather at Baylor) asked if I could finish Gloer’s manuscript.  And I’ve spent the last few months doing so.

I’d originally hoped to have 300 – 325 double spaced pages, and ended up with 425: OUCH! Did I type all that stuff?

What’s innovative or fresh about the commentary? Two things, off the top of my head:

First, it is a scholarly commentary, interacting extensively with primary sources (Philo and Josephus, especially) and cutting-edge secondary sources (e.g., Bruce Winter’s work on the new Roman woman), BUT the exposition is aimed at preachers and teachers. This would be the first commentary I would recommend for people who want to preach these letters.

Second, this is the first commentary on the Pastorals to take into account the role that succession plays in these letters.

I’m Back!!

After some time away, I’m working in the Pastorals again.  Here’s a rather disjointed series of thoughts on what I’m doing.

The time away: last spring, I was named the Dean of the Sack School of Bible and Ministry at Kentucky Christian University, the school where I’ve taught for five years.  Administration has left me with almost no time to write, especially since our Youth and Family Ministries professor left without warning in June.

Writing again: my doktorvater, Charles Talbert, has invited me to finish the commentary on the Pastorals and Philemon in the Smyth and Helwys Reading the New Testament series.  This particular volume, which will be published under the title Reading Paul’s Letters to Individuals, has a checkered past.  Several NT scholars have had the contract at one time or another.  I’ll be completing work that Hulit Gloer was not able to finish due to health reasons.

My deadline: 4 July, which is growing nearer every day.

How it’s going: I made the mistake, when I first started writing, of trying to tackle Philemon first.  But I don’t know Philemon as well as I know the PE, so I’ve gotten a bit bogged down.  So I’ve started writing on the PE again.

Little projects that make up the big project:

  • In April, I’ll be presenting a paper at the Stone Campbell Journal conference, at Cincinnati Christian University.  The paper will deal with 1 Timothy 2.
  • The commentary will build on the reading of the PE from my monograph, Leadership Succession, and on the papers that I’ve read at SBL in Philadelphia (a narrative reading of the PE, using Aristotle’s Poetics as my primary lens) and Washington.
  • In the commentary, I will treat the letters in the order Titus – 1 Timothy – 2 Timothy – Philemon.

Epictetus and the Pastoral Epistles

I happened across a book titled Epictetus and the New Testament by one Douglas Simmonds Sharp, published in 1914. The only copy I found was in Logos Bible Software’s SeminaryLibrary.com. Actually, there is a copy in Google Books, but for some unknown reason it has restricted access (even though it was published in 1914). Anyway, on pp. 74-75, the following like word usages are listed: εμπλεκω and επιπλησσω. Here’s the image I cropped from the book; I don’t really have time to retype it (apologies for that):



Sharp, Douglas Simmonds. Epictetus and the New Testament. London: C. H. Kelly, 1914. pp. 74-75.

I include it here because I thought it might be interesting to some; also because it serves as a mental note to evaluate at a later point when I do further work on similarities between the Pastorals and other contemporary literature (e.g. the Apostolic Fathers)

Pastoral Epistles at the 2007 ETS Meeting

I was perusing the printed ETS 2007 program the other day and noted the following sessions having to do with the Pastoral Epistles. If you’re going to be at the ETS meeting in San Diego this November, maybe you should try to catch one of these papers.


Wednesday Morning (Nov 14)



Garden Salon Two
New Testament
Theme: Paul


9:20-10:00 AM
Greg MaGee (Trinity Evangelical Divinity School)
Paul’s Response to the Shame and Pain of Imprisonment in 2 Timothy


11:00-11:40 AM
L. Timothy Swinson (Trinity Evangelical Divinity School)
“Faithful Sayings” or One Faithful Word? Another View of πιστος ο λογος in the Pastoral Epistles



Thursday Morning (Nov 15)



Hampton
Literature of the Bible Study Group
Theme: Familiar Biblical Texts Through a Literary Lens


8:30-11:40 AM
[note that there are three papers plus a planning meeting in this time frame, Ray’s paper is second]
Ray Van Neste (Union University)
Looking Through a Literary Lens at a Pastoral Epistle



Thursday Afternoon (Nov 15)



Garden Salon Two
Patristics Study Group
Theme: Early Christianity in Africa


2:10-5:20 PM
[note that there are four papers in this time frame, the below paper is listed fourth]
Francis X. Gumerlock (Providence Theological Seminary)
When ‘All’ meant ‘Some’: Fulgentius of Ruspe on $esv(1Ti 2.4)
Respondent: Paul Hartog (Faith Baptist Theological Seminary)



Friday Morning (Nov 16)



Royal Palm Salon Three
New Testament


11:30AM-12:10PM
[this isn’t specifically on the Pastorals, but 1Co 14.33 always comes up when you’re discussing $esv(1Ti 2.11-15)]
William Warren (New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary)
Orderly Worship or Silent Women: A Study of $esv(1 Corinthians 14.33)


Unfortunately, I’ll have to miss most of these sessions. I don’t arrive until early Wednesday afternoon so I’ll miss the Wednesday AM papers (Swinson’s sounds good; I heard him present on a text-critical issue in the Pastorals last year). I present a non-Pastoral-Epistles paper on Wednesday afternoon (at 4:10 in Garden Salon Two). On Friday morning, I moderate a section on the Gospel of John (from 9:00 to 12:10 in Royal Palm Salon Five, do stop by and say ‘hello’ if you’d like).

Review of Alfons Weiser on Second Timothy

In this week’s Review of Biblical Literature, Raymond F. Collins reviews Alfons Weiser’s Der zweite Brief an Timotheus, which is part of the EKK (Evangelisch-Katholischer Kommentar zum Neuen Testament) commentary series.


Since I’m not able to read German, I’m grateful for the review. Sounds like there is decent interaction with patristic literature (yay!), though it also sounds like Weiser approaches the text as a pseudepigraphon — in both sender and receiver.